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NASA 50th
Laurence Bergreen | Linda Billings | Andrew J. Butrica | Erik Conway | David H. DeVorkin | Steven J. Dick | Robert Ferguson | James R. Fleming | Edward Goldstein | Michael Griffin | Richard P. Hallion | James R. Hansen | J. D. Hunley | Stephen Johnson | John Krige | W. Henry (Harry) Lambright| John M. Logsdon | Maura Mackowski | Howard McCurdy | Michael Meltzer | Michael J. Neufeld | Anthony M. Springer | Joseph N. Tatarewicz

Laurence Bergreen is an award-winning biographer, historian, and chronicler of exploration. His books have been translated into eighteen languages worldwide.  In October 2007, Alfred A. Knopf published Marco Polo: From Venice to Xanadu, a groundbreaking biography of the iconic traveler.  Warner Brothers is developing a feature film based on this book starring Matt Damon and written by William Monahan, who won an Oscar for “The Departed.”   His previous work, Over the Edge of the World: Magellan’s Terrifying Circumnavigation of the Globe, was published to international acclaim by William Morrow/HarperCollins in October 2003.  A New York Times “Notable Book” for 2003, it is also in development as a motion picture and is now in its twentieth printing. In addition, Bergreen is the author of Voyage to Mars: NASA’s Search for Life Beyond Earth, a narrative of NASA’s exploration of Mars, published in November 2000 by Penguin Putnam.  Dramatic rights were acquired by TNT. 

In 1997, Bantam Doubleday Dell published Louis Armstrong: An Extravagant Life, a comprehensive biography drawing on unpublished manuscripts and exclusive interviews with Armstrong colleagues and friends.  It appeared on many “Best Books of 1997” lists, including those of the San Francisco Chronicle, the Philadelphia Inquirer, and Publishers Weekly, and has been published in Germany, Finland, and Great Britain.  In 1994, Simon & Schuster published his Capone: The Man and the Era.  A Book-of-the-Month Club selection, it has been published in numerous foreign languages, was optioned by Miramax, and was a New York Times “Notable Book.” His biography, As Thousands Cheer: The Life of Irving Berlin, appeared in 1990.  This book won the Ralph J. Gleason Music Book Award and the ASCAP-Deems Taylor award and received front-page reviews in major American and British newspapers and appeared on bestseller lists; it was also a New York Times “Notable Book” for 1990.  His previous biography, James Agee: A Life, was also critically acclaimed and was a New York Times “Notable Book” for 1984.  His first book was Look Now, Pay Later: The Rise of Network Broadcasting, published by Doubleday in 1980.  He has written for many national publications including EsquireNewsweekTV GuideDetails, PrologueThe Chicago Tribune, andMilitary History Quarterly.   He has taught at the New School for Social Research and served as Assistant to the President of the Museum of Television and Radio in New York.  In 1995, he served as a judge for the National Book Awards and in 1991 as a judge for the PEN/Albrand Nonfiction Award.  A frequent lecturer at major universities and symposiums, he also serves as a Featured Historian for the History Channel.
Mr. Bergreen graduated from Harvard University in 1972.  He is a member of PEN American Center, The Explorers Club, the Authors Guild, and the board of the New York Society Library.  He lives in New York City

 

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Linda Billings is a communication researcher and policy analyst based in Washington, D.C. She currently serves as coordinator of communications for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Astrobiology Program in the Science Mission Directorate, under an Intergovernmental Personnel Agreement with the SETI Institute of Mountain View, CA. In this position, Dr. Billings is responsible for managing communications, education, and outreach activities for the Astrobiology Program.  From September 2002 through December 2006, Dr. Billings conducted science and risk communication research for NASA’s Planetary Protection Office.  From September 1999 through August 2002, she was Director of Communications for SPACEHAB Inc., a builder of space habitats.  Dr. Billings has three decades of experience in Washington, D.C., as a researcher, analyst, and journalist. She was the founding editor of Space Business News (1983-5) and the first senior editor for space at Air & Space/Smithsonian magazine (1986-8). She was a contributing author for First Contact: The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (New American Library, 1990). Her freelance articles have been published in outlets such as the Chicago Tribune, Washington Post Magazine, and Space News. Dr. Billings was a member of the staff for the National Commission on Space (1985-86).

Dr. Billings’ expertise is in mass communication, science communication, risk communication, rhetorical analysis, journalism studies, and social studies of science. Her research has focused on the role that journalists play in constructing the cultural authority of scientists and the rhetorical strategies that scientists and journalists employ in communicating about science.  She earned her B.A. in social sciences from the State University of New York at Binghamton, her M.A. in international transactions from George Mason University, and her Ph.D. in mass communication from Indiana University’s School of Journalism.  Dr. Billings served as an officer of Women in Aerospace for 15 years and was president of WIA in 2003.

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Andrew J. Butrica earned a Ph.D. in history of technology and science from Iowa State University in 1986.  He was a Chercheur Associé at the Center for Research in the History of Science and Technology (Centre de Recherches en Histoire des Sciences et Techniques) at the Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie in Paris, before embarking on a career as a research historian.  Among other books, he has written To See the Unseen, which won the Leopold Prize of the Organization of American Historians; Single Stage To Orbit: Politics, Space Technology, and the Quest for Reusable Rocketry, a history of the Reagan Revolution and the DC-X experimental rocket, which won the 2005 Michael C. Robinson Prize of the National Council on Public History.  More recently he has written monographs on NASA’s role in the manufacture of integrated circuits during the Apollo era and the agency’s contributions to the early history of MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems), and he currently is writing a history of NASA’s deep-space navigation.

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Erik Conway is the historian at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. His duties include research and writing, conducting oral histories, and contributing to the lab’s historical collections. Before JPL, he worked as a contract historian at Langley Research Center. Conway enjoys studying the historical interaction between national politics, scientific research, and technological change. For his current research in robotic Mars exploration, he analyzes the effects of changing policies on project management and planetary science. His History of Atmospheric Science at NASA will be published by Johns Hopkins University Press in 2008.  He is also co-author on two articles on the history of climate science published this year: Naomi Oreskes, Erik M. Conway, and Matthew Shindell, “From Chicken Little to Dr. Pangloss: William Nierenberg, Global Warming, and the Social Deconstruction of Scientific Knowledge,” Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences, Vol. 38, Number 1, pp. 113–156; Oreskes and Conway, “Challenging Knowledge: How Climate Science Became a Victim of the Cold War,” Agnotology: The Making and Unmaking of Ignorance, eds. Robert N. Proctor and Londa Schiebinger (Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2008), 55-89.

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David H. DeVorkin is senior curator, history of astronomy and the space sciences at the National Air and Space Museum. DeVorkin's major research interests are in the origins and development of modern astrophysics during the 20th Century and the origins and development of the space sciences from the V-2 to the present.  He is the author/editor/compiler of 9 books and over 100 scholarly and popular articles, most recently, with Robert Smith and Elizabeth Kessler, The Hubble Space Telescope: New Views of the Universe (National Geographic Books 2004).  Earlier works include Beyond Earth: Mapping the Universe (2002), Henry Norris Russell: Dean of American Astronomers (2000) and The American Astronomical Society’s First Century (1999), Science with a Vengeance (1992) and Race to the Stratosphere (1989). DeVorkin holds the PhD in the history of astronomy from the University of Leicester (1978) and the Master of Philosophy in Astronomy from Yale (1970). DeVorkin has curated "Stars" (1983-1997); "V-2: The World's First Ballistic Missile System" (1990-); and most recently "Explore the Universe" (2001-).

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Steven J. Dick is the Chief Historian for NASA and Director of the NASA History Office.  He obtained his B.S. in astrophysics (1971), and MA and PhD (1977) in history and philosophy of science from Indiana University.  He worked as an astronomer and historian of science at the U. S. Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C. for 24 years, including three years on a mountaintop in New Zealand, before coming to NASA Headquarters in 2003. Among his books are Plurality of Worlds:  The Origins of the Extraterrestrial Life Debate from Democritus to Kant (1982) (translated into French), The Biological Universe:  The Twentieth Century Extraterrestrial Life Debate and the Limits of Science (Cambridge University Press, 1996),  and Life on Other Worlds (1998), the latter translated into Chinese, Italian, Czech, Greek and Polish.  His most recent books are (with James Strick) The Living Universe:  NASA and the Development of Astrobiology (2004), and a comprehensive history of the U. S. Naval Observatory, Sky and Ocean Joined:  The U. S. Naval Observatory, 1830-2000 (2003).  The latter received the Pendleton Prize of the Society for History in the Federal Government.    He is also editor of Many Worlds:  The New Universe, Extraterrestrial Life and the Theological Implications (2000), and (with Keith Cowing) Risk and Exploration:  Earth, Sea and Stars (NASA SP-2005-4701 (Washington, D.C., 2005).   His latest works are edited volumes (with Roger Launius) on Critical Issues in the History of Spaceflight (NASA SP-4702, 2006) and Societal Impact of Spaceflight (NASA SP 4801, 2007).

Dr. Dick is the recipient of the Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Medal, the NASA Group Achievement Award for his role in NASA’s multidisciplinary program in astrobiology, and the 2006  LeRoy E. Doggett Prize for Historical Astronomy of the American Astronomical Society.  He has served as Chairman of the Historical Astronomy Division of the American Astronomical Society, as President of the History of Astronomy Commission of the International Astronomical Union, and as President of the Philosophical Society of Washington.  He is a corresponding member of the International Academy of Astronautics.

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Robert Ferguson is a Washington D.C. based historian of technology.  On behalf of the NASA History Office, he is completing a manuscript on the history of NASA’s aeronautics research.  Dr. Ferguson is a graduate of the University of Minnesota Program in the History of Science and Technology.  He taught at the Hong Kong University of Science & Technology and was awarded the university-wide medal for distinguished teaching.  He was the 2003 Ramsey Fellow in Naval Aviation History at the National Air and Space Museum.  His other principle area of research is World War II American aircraft manufacturing.

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James R. Fleming is Professor of Science, Technology and Society at Colby College.  He earned a Ph.D. in history from Princeton University, with earlier degrees in astronomy (B.S., Penn State) and atmospheric science (M.S. Colorado State).  He worked in climate modeling and airborne observations, held a fellowship with the Joseph Henry Papers at the Smithsonian Institution, and served as the historian of the American Meteorological Society.  Since coming to Colby, Professor Fleming has held NEH, NSF, Smithsonian (Lindbergh), and AAAS (Revelle) fellowships and was appointed a visiting scholar at MIT (1992), Harvard (1999), the National Air and Space Museum (2005), and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (2006).  He was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science "for pioneering studies on the history of meteorology and climate change and for the advancement of historical work within meteorological societies" and is the founder and first president of the International Commission on History of Meteorology.  Professor Fleming recently served on the National Research Council's Committee on Scientific Accomplishments of Earth Observations from Space and as chair of the AAAS section on history and philosophy of science.  He has written or edited more than a dozen books including Meteorology in America, 1800-1870 (1990), Historical Perspectives on Climate Change (1998), and The Callendar Effect: the Life and Work of Guy Stewart Callendar (2007).

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Edward Goldstein is the Lead Writer at NASA Headquarters.  For over six years he has written speeches, testimony and other communications for NASA’s senior leaders.  He also was project manager for the commemorative publication, “NASA: 50 Years of Exploration and Discovery,” and for organizing the NASA speaker panels at the 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival.  Dr. Goldstein received his Ph.D. in Public Administration from The George Washington University in January, 2007 for the dissertation “NASA’s Earth Science Program: The Bureaucratic Struggles of the Space Agency’s Mission to Planet Earth.”  From 2007 he has served as an adjunct faculty member teaching about the environment, politics and public policy at American University, the Catholic University of America and Georgetown University.  In the Administration of President George H.W. Bush, Dr. Goldstein was Deputy Associate Director for Energy, Environmental and Natural Resources Policy in the White House Office of Domestic and Economic Policy. 

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Michael Griffin.  Prior to being nominated as NASA Administrator, Michael Griffin was serving as Space Department Head at Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md. He was previously President and Chief Operating Officer of In-Q-Tel, Inc., and also served in several positions within Orbital Sciences Corporation, Dulles, Va., including Chief Executive Officer of Orbital's Magellan Systems division and General Manager of the Space Systems Group.  Earlier in his career, Griffin served as chief engineer and as associate administrator for exploration at NASA, and as deputy for technology at the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization. He has been an adjunct professor at the University of Maryland, Johns Hopkins University, and George Washington University, where he taught courses in spacecraft design, applied mathematics, guidance and navigation, compressible flow, computational fluid dynamics, spacecraft attitude control, astrodynamics and introductory aerospace engineering. He is the lead author of more than two dozen technical papers, as well as the textbook, "Space Vehicle Design."

A registered professional engineer in Maryland and California, Griffin is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the International Academy of Astronautics, an Honorary Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), a Fellow of the American Astronautical Society, and a Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. He is a recipient of the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal, the AIAA Space Systems Medal, and the Department of Defense Distinguished Public Service Medal, the highest award given to a non-government employee.  Griffin received a bachelor's degree in physics from Johns Hopkins University; a master's degree in aerospace science from Catholic University of America; a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the University of Maryland; a master's degree in electrical engineering from the University of Southern California; a master's degree in applied physics from Johns Hopkins University; a master's degree in business administration from Loyola College; and a master's degree in Civil Engineering from George Washington University. He is a certified flight instructor with instrument and multiengine ratings.

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Richard P. Hallion is the 2007-2008 Alfred Verville Fellow, Department of Aeronautics, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.  He was formerly Senior Adviser for Air and Space Issues, Directorate for Security, Counterintelligence and Special Programs Oversight, Office of the Secretary of the Air Force, the Pentagon, Washington, DC, before retiring in November 2006.   Dr. Hallion has broad experience in science and technology policy, research, development, and management analysis, and has served as a consultant to various professional organizations.  He has flown as a mission observer (not pilot) in a wide range of high-performance military and civilian fixed and rotary-wing aircraft. Dr. Hallion is the author and editor of numerous books, articles, and essays on aerospace technology and military operations, and consults, teaches, and lectures widely.

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James R. Hansen is Professor of History and Director of the Honors College at Auburn University in Alabama. An expert in aerospace history, for the past 26 years Hansen has written books and articles about the history of science and technology, covering a wide variety of topics ranging from the early days of aviation, the first nuclear fusion reactors, to the Moon landings. His most recent book, First Man (Simon & Schuster, 2005), the first and only authorized biography of Neil Armstrong, first man on the Moon, spent three weeks on the New York Times Bestseller list and garnered major book awards, including the American Astronautical Society’s Prize for Astronautical Literature, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics’ Outstanding Book Award, and CHOICE magazine’s Outstanding Academic Book of 2006. A two-volume Japanese translation of First Man has been published, with translations into German, Chinese, Turkish, and Croatian in progress. 

In 1995 the National Aeronautics and Space Administration nominated his book Spaceflight Revolution for a Pulitzer Prize, the only time NASA has ever made such a nomination. His book From the Ground Up (1988) won the History Book Award of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. His scholarship has also been honored with the Robert H. Goddard Award from the National Space Club and certificates of distinction from the Air Force Historical Foundation. His other recent books, The Bird is on the Wing (Texas A&M University Press) and The Wind and Beyond (NASA) explore the role of aerodynamics in the progress of the airplane in America. The latter is a six-volume series prepared by Hansen and a team of his graduate students for NASA, volume two of which, Reinventing the Airplane, just appeared in late 2007. In 2005 The Wind and Beyond won the Society for the History of Technology’s Eugene Ferguson Prize for Outstanding Reference Work. His forthcoming book, Truth, Lies, and O-Rings: The Inside Story of the Space Shuttle Challenger Disaster, will be published by the University Press of Florida.

Dr. Hansen has served on a number of important advisory boards and panels, including the Research Advisory Board of the National Air and Space Museum, the Editorial Advisory Board of the Smithsonian Institution Press, and the Advisory Board for the Archives of Aerospace Exploration at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He is also a past vice-president of the Virginia Air and Space Museum in Hampton, Virginia.  A native of Fort Wayne, Indiana, he graduated summa cum laude and with Honors from Indiana University. He earned his Ph.D. at The Ohio State University in 1981. Jim has taught history at Auburn University since 1986. Both his teaching and his scholarship have received numerous awards from the university including the Teaching Excellence Award in the Humanities, an Alumni Professorship, the Outstanding Teacher in the Core Curriculum, and the Office of the Vice President for Research’s Creative Research Award. In 2005, he was inducted into the College of Liberal Arts’ Academy of Teaching and Outstanding Scholars.

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J. D. Hunley, a former NASA Headquarters and Air Force historian, retired in 2001 as the first chief historian at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. In 2001-2002 he was the Ramsey Fellow at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. He has written or edited a large number of books and articles about various aspects of aerospace history. Most recently, he has published three books about the history of rocketry: J.D. Hunley, The Development of Propulsion Technology for U.S. Space-Launch Vehicles, 1926-1991 (College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press, 2007); J.D. Hunley, Preludes to U.S. Space-Launch Vehicle Technology: Goddard Rockets to Minuteman III (Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2008) and  U.S. Space-Launch Vehicle Technology: Viking to Space Shuttle (Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2008). For an earlier version of the propulsion technology book, he won the 2006 History Manuscript Award from the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

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Stephen Johnson is an associate research professor with the Institute for Science and Space Studies at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, and a Health Management Systems Engineer for the Advanced Sensors and System Health Management Branch, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. He was a faculty member at the University of North Dakota Department of Space Studies from 1997 to 2005, teaching military space, space history, and management and economics of space endeavors. He is the author of The United States Air Force and the Culture of Innovation, 1945-1965 and The Secret of Apollo: Systems Management in American and European Space Programs, both published in 2002. He was also the editor of Quest: The History of Spaceflight Quarterly from 1998-2005 and is currently the general editor for a two-volume encyclopedia of space history to be published in 2009 by ABC-CLIO, Space Exploration and Humanity: A Historical Encyclopedia. He currently works on the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle project of the Constellation program. His current research involves dependable space system design and operations, space industry management and economics, the history of space science and technology, and the history of cognitive psychology and artificial intelligence. He received his bachelors degree in physics from Whitman College in 1981, and his doctorate in 1997 in the History of Science and Technology from the University of Minnesota, where he was also the Associate Director of the Babbage Institute for the History of Computing. Prior to 1997, he worked for Northrop and Martin Marietta, and was co-owner of his own small business, managing computer simulation laboratories, designing space probes, and developing engineering processes.

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John Krige is the Kranzberg Professor in the School of History, Technology and Society at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta.   His main area of research concerns the place of science and technology in US foreign policy in Western Europe after WWII.  He is currently the PI on a NASA-funded project to write the history of NASA’s international relations in space.

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W. Henry (Harry) Lambright is Professor of Public Administration and Political Science at the Maxwell School, Syracuse University. He is author or editor of seven books, and over 275 articles, papers, and reports. His books include a biography, Powering Apollo: James E. Webb of NASA (Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins, 1995), and Space Policy in the 21st Century (Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins, 2003). A longstanding student of leadership and change in government, he recently has received support from IBM for monographs on other NASA Administrators: Transforming NASA: Dan Goldin and the Remaking of NASA (Washington DC: IBM, 2001), and Executive Response to Changing Fortune: Sean O’Keefe as NASA Administrator (Washington DC, IBM, 2005).  IBM is supporting research on NASA Administrator Michael Griffin and his effort to implement the Moon-Mars decision of 2004. Dr. Lambright is also currently researching a book under NASA sponsorship on Mars exploration.

Dr. Lambright has served as a guest scholar at the Brookings Institution; the director of the Science and Technology Policy Center at the Syracuse Research Corporation; and director of the Center for Environmental Policy and Administration at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. He has also served as an adjunct professor in the Graduate Program of Environmental Science in the College of Environmental Science and Forestry at the State University of New York.   Dr. Lambright’s interest in NASA and space policy goes back to his years as a graduate student. Early in his career, he served as a special assistant at NASA, working in the then Office of University Affairs, and also writing speeches for NASA Administrator, Tom Paine. The recipient of a range of grants from federal and private organizations for his research in science and technology policy, he is frequently cited in the media. He teaches courses in Science, Technology, and Public Policy and Energy and Environmental Policy.  He has a Bachelor’s degree from Johns Hopkins and Master’s and PhD degrees from Columbia.

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John M. Logsdon was, until mid-2008, Director of the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs, where he is also Professor Emeritus of Political Science and International Affairs. In September 2008, Dr. Logsdon will become the Lindbergh Chair in Aerospace History for 2008-2009 at the National Air and Space Museum. He holds a B.S. in Physics from Xavier University (1960) and a Ph.D. in Political Science from New York University (1970). Dr. Logsdon’s research interests focus on the policy and historical aspects of U.S. and international space activities.  Dr. Logsdon is the author of The Decision to Go to the Moon: Project Apollo and the National Interest and is general editor of the eight-volume series Exploring the Unknown: Selected Documents in the History of the U.S. Civil Space Program. He has written numerous articles and reports on space policy and history. He is frequently consulted by the electronic and print media for his views on space issues.

Dr. Logsdon is a member of the NASA Advisory Council and of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee of the Department of Transportation. In 2003, he served as a member of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. He is a recipient of the NASA Distinguished Public Service and Public Service Medals, the 2005 John F. Kennedy Award from the American Astronautical Society, and the 2006 Barry Goldwater Space Educator Award of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a member of the International Academy of Astronautics.

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Maura Mackowski is currently working on a history of NASA life sciences research from 1980 to 2005, under contract to the NASA Headquarters History Office. She is the author of Testing the Limits: Aviation Medicine and the Origins of Manned Space Flight (Texas A&M University Press, 2006), which won an Honorable Mention in the 2006 Eugene Emme Astronautical Literature Award from the American Astronautical Society. Before earning her PhD in modern U.S. history at Arizona State University, she was a freelance writer covering science, technology, medicine, and high-tech business for publications in the U.S. and Europe. She currently resides in Gilbert, Arizona.

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Howard McCurdy is a professor in the School of Public Affairs at American University in Washington, D.C, and chair of its Department of Public Administration and Policy.  Author or co-author of seven books on the U.S. space program, he is known for Space and the American Imagination, winner of the Eugene M. Emme Astronautical Literature Award, and Inside NASA, a study of NASA’s organizational culture that received the Henry Adams prize for that year’s best history on the federal government.  He recently authored Faster, Better, Cheaper, a critical analysis of cost-cutting initiatives in the U.S. space program and just finished Robots in Space, coauthored with Roger D. Launius, which examines the continuing controversy between advocates of human and robotic space flight.  Dr. McCurdy is often consulted by the media on space policy issues and has appeared on national news outlets such as the Jim Lehrer News Hour, National Public Radio, and NBC Nightly News.  He received his bachelor’s and master’s degree from the University of Washington and his doctorate from Cornell University.

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Michael Meltzer is an environmental scientist who has been writing about science and technology for 30 years.  His books and articles have investigated topics that include NASA expeditions to Jupiter and Saturn, planetary environmental protection, solar house design, industrial pollution prevention, and the history of US commercial fishing. He has also published two science fiction stories with environmental themes. Michael worked for fifteen years at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where he helped start a pollution prevention program.  He lives in Oakland, California with his wife Naisa and seven-year-old daughter Jordana. 

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Michael J. Neufeld is Chair of the Space History Division of the National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. Born in Canada, he received history degrees from the University of Calgary and the University of British Columbia, before getting a Ph.D. in Modern European History from The Johns Hopkins University in 1984. Before Dr. Neufeld came to the National Air and Space Museum in 1988 as A. Verville Fellow, he taught at various universities in upstate New York. In 1989-90 he held Smithsonian and NSF fellowships at NASM. In 1990 he was hired as a Museum Curator in the Aeronautics Division, where he remained until early 1999. After transferring to the Space History Division, he took over the collection of German World War II missiles, and from 2003-2007 the collection of Mercury and Gemini spacecraft and components. In fall 2001, he was a Senior Lecturer at The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. He was named Chair of Space History in January 2007.

In addition to authoring numerous scholarly articles, Dr. Neufeld has written three books: The Skilled Metalworkers of Nuremberg: Craft and Class in the Industrial Revolution (1989), The Rocket and the Reich: Peenemünde and the Coming of the Ballistic Missile Era (1995), which won two book prizes, and Von Braun: Dreamer of Space, Engineer of War, which Alfred A. Knopf published in September 2007. He has also edited Yves Béon’s memoir Planet Dora (1997) and is the co-editor of The Bombing of Auschwitz: Should the Allies Have Attempted It? (2000).

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Anthony M. Springer is the Lead for Communications and Education in Aeronautics Research at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Headquarters.  Here he is responsible for all communications and education activities related to aeronautics for the Agency. Previously he served as the Alliance Development Manager for the Office of Aerospace Technology where he was responsible for the development and coordination of strategic alliances between NASA and its stakeholders including industry, academia, other agencies and the public.  He has also served as the Director for all NASA Centennial of Flight activities, and on the National Centennial of Flight Commission History and Education Panel.  He has been the NASA resident manager for the X-34 project at Orbital Sciences Corporation in Dulles, Virginia, where he was responsible for the day to day activities and contractor interfaces with the contractor designing and fabricating the X-34 for NASA.  Mr. Springer has also held positions as a project and test engineer with NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.  At Marshall he conducted wind tunnel tests and developed the preliminary aerodynamics for numerous future launch vehicle concepts.  During this time Mr. Springer did research on the application of rapid prototyping methods to high speed wind tunnel testing and other topics related to advanced applications for NASA’s wind tunnels.  In addition Mr. Springer served as the lab lead engineer on the Bantam Launch vehicle program, a test engineer for solid rocket motor air-flow testing, and a diver in Marshall’s Neutral Buoyancy Simulator, among other tasks.  His career started with NASA as a cooperative education student at Marshall in the late 1980’s.  Mr. Springer has published many technical and historical publications along with receiving numerous NASA awards over his career.  He is a graduate of the University of Illinois with a Bachelors of Science in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering and an Associate of Arts degree from Kankakee Community College.  He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and is married and lives outside Washington D.C. with his wife Emily and son Oliver.

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Joseph N. Tatarewicz, Associate Professor in the Department of History and Director of the Human Context of Science & Technology Certificate program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County holds MA degrees in Philosophy (Catholic University 1976), History and Philosophy of Science (Indiana University 1980) and the PhD in History and Philosophy of Science (Indiana University 1984).  He is author of Space Technology and Planetary Astronomy (Indiana University Press, 1990), a contributor to The Space Telescope: A Study of NASA, Science, Technology, and Politics (Cambridge University Press, 1989 & 1993), and has authored numerous articles and reviews for professional journals and publications in the history of science and technology.  His book length NASA-sponsored scholarly history, Exploring the Solar System: the Planetary Sciences Since Galileo, was awarded the History Manuscript Award of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and will be published by the Johns Hopkins University Press.  He began his career in space history as a NASA History Office Intern (1980), followed by predoctoral and postdoctoral Guggenheim fellowships at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum, where he later served in curatorial and administrative positions.  He has served as Associate Director and Curator of the Center for the History of Electrical Engineering and as a consulting historian for various government agencies.

 

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