CP-2156 Life In The Universe

 

- Table of Contents -

 

 

PREFACE.

John Billingham, Chief, Extraterrestrial Research Division, Ames Research Center, NASA, Moffett Field, Calif.

CONFERENCE OVERVIEW.

A. Thomas Young (As Deputy Director of NASA Ames Research Center, Mr. Young welcomed the participants to the June 1979 Conference. Mr. Young is now Director of NASA's Goddard Spaceflight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.)

INTRODUCTION.

Robert A. Frosch (Dr. Frosch attended the opening day of the Conference, and his introductory remarks as the NASA Administrator reflected the importance he placed on NASA 's research efforts regarding the nature and distribution of life in the Universe. His talk, included in its entirety, set the tone for the Conference. Dr. Frosch is now President of the American Association of Engineering Societies.)

THREE ERAS OF COSMIC EVOLUTION.

Eric J. Chaisson, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

 

PART I

 

ORIGIN OF LIFE.

Harold P. Klein, Session Chairman Director of Life Sciences, Ames Research Center, NASA, Moffett Field, Calif.

Comments

ORGANIC CHEMICAL EVOLUTION.

Sherwood Chang, Ames Research Center, NASA Moffett Field, Calif.

SULFUR: FOUNTAINHEAD OF LIFE IN THE UNIVERSE?.

Benton C. Clark, Martin Marietta Aerospace, Denver, Colo.

ROLE OF INTERFACIAL WATER AND WATER IN THIN FILMS IN THE ORIGIN OF LIFE.

Duwayne M. Anderson, State University of New York, Buffalo, N. Y.

 

PART II

 

LIFE-SUPPORTING ENVIRONMENTS.

George H. Herbig, Session Chairman, Professor of Astronomy, University of California, Santa Cruz, Calif.

Comments

ATMOSPHERES AND EVOLUTION.

Lynn Margulis, Boston University, Boston, Mass., and James E Lovelock, Reading University, Reading, England

ORIGIN AND EVOLUTION OF CONTINENTS AND OCEANS.

Karl K. Turekian, Yale University, New Haven, Conn.

CLIMATIC STABILITY.

Donald M. Hunten, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz.

STELLAR INFLUENCES ON THE EMERGENCE OF INTELLIGENT LIFE.

Martin Cohen, University of California, Berkeley, Calif.

PLANETARY ORBITS IN MULTIPLE STAR SYSTEMS.

Robert S. Harrington, U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington, D.C.

CONSTRAINTS ON EARLY LIFE BY EARTH'S ACCRETIONAL AND PREACCRETIONAL DEVELOPMENT.

Gustaf Arrhenius, Scripps Institution of Oceanoyraphy University of California La Jolla Calif.

COSMIC CONCLUSIONS FROM CLIMATIC MODELS: CAN THEY BE JUSTIFIED?.

Stephen H. Schneider, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo.., and Starley L. Thompson, formerly at University of Washington, Seattle, Wash., currently at National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo..

EVOLUTION OF OXYGEN AND OZONE IN EARTH'S ATMOSPHERE.

James F. Kasting and Thomas M. Donahue, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.

PROSPECTS FOR DETECTING OTHER PLANETARY SYSTEMS.

David C. Black, Ames Research Center, NASA, Moffett Field, Calif.

DETECTING PLANETS IN BINARY SYSTEMS WITH SPECKLE INTERFEROMETRY.

Simon P. Worden, formerly at Air Force Geophysics Laboratory, Sunspot, N. Mex., currently at Space Division Los Angeles Air Force Station, Los Angeles, Calif.

 

PART III

 

PANEL DISCUSSION.

Summarized by Mark A. Stull, Ames Research Center, NASA, Moffett Field, Calif.

 

PART IV

 

EVOLUTION OF COMPLEX LIFE IN THE GALAXY.

Mark A. Stull, Session Chairman, Extraterrestrial Research Division, Ames Research Center, NASA, Moffett Field, Calif. (now practicing law in Maryland)

Comments

TRANSFER RNA AND THE ORIGIN OF PROTEIN SYNTHESIS.

Alexander Rich, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.

EMERGENCE AND RADIATION OF MULTICELLULAR ORGANISMS.

James W. Valentine, University of California, Santa Barbara, Calif.

SPECULATIONS ON THE EVOLUTION OF INTELLIGENCE IN MULTICELLULAR ORGANISMS.

Dale A. Russell, National Museum of Natural Sciences, Ottawa, Canada

EVOLUTION OF TECHNOLOGICAL SPECIES.

Bernard Campbell, L. S. B. Leakey Foundation, Pasadena, Calif.

ASTROPHYSICAL CRISES IN THE EVOLUTION OF LIFE IN THE GALAXY.

Wallace H. Tucker, Harvard-Smithsonian and U.S. International University, Bonsall, Calif.

BI0CHEMICAL KEYS TO THE EMERGENCE OF COMPLEX LIFE.

Kenneth M. Towe, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

GRAVITY, LIGNIFICATION, AND LAND PLANT EVOLUTION.

S. M. Siegel, B. Z. Siegel, and Jung Chen, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii.

EVOLUTION OF MAN AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF THE EVOLUTION OF INTELLIGENT LIFE.

C. Owen Lovejoy, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio

 

PART V

 

DETECTABILITY OF TECHNOLOGICAL CIVILIZATIONS.

Frank D. Drake, Session Chairman Professor of Astronomy, Cornell, University, Ithaca, N. Y.; and Director, National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, Arecibo, Puerto Rico

Comments

IDENTIFIABILITY OF SUITABLE STARS.

Kenneth Janes, Boston University, Boston, Ma.

MANIFESTATIONS OF ADVANCED CIVILIZATIONS.

Ronald N. Bracewell, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.

SEARCH STRATEGIES.

Bernard M. Oliver, Hewlett-Packard Corporation, Palo AIto, Calif.

EAVESDROPPING MODE AND RADIO LEAKAGE FROM EARTH.

Woodruff T. Sullivan III, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash.

SETI- THE SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE: PLANS AND RATIONALE.

John H. Wolfe, Ames Research Center, NASA, Moffett Field, Calif.

Robert E. Edelson, formerly at Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pasadena, Calif., currently at GTE Laboratories, Waltham, Mass.

John Billingham, Ames Research Center, NASA, Moffett Field, Calif.

R. Bruce Crow, Samuel Gulkis, and Edward T. Olsen, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

Bernard M. Oliver, Hewlett-Packard Corporation, Palo Alto, Calif.

Allen M. Peterson, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.

Charles L. Seeger, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, Calif.

Jill C. Tarter, University of California, Berkeley, Calif.

 

PART VI

 

REFLECTIONS.

Philip Morrison, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.

 

GLOSSARY.