SP-345 Evolution of the Solar System

 

FIGURE 21.12.3.- Simplified diagram of the effect of transplanetary condensation on the chemical composition of the planets.

 

FIGURE 21.12.3.- Simplified diagram of the effect of transplanetary condensation on the chemical composition of the planets. The primary emplacement of plasma controlled by the critical velocity produced the A, B, C, and D clouds. The A and B clouds were enriched in He and H. The C cloud composition was enriched in C, 0, N, and Ne, while the D cloud contained an excess of heavy elements. Part of the D cloud condensation took place outside the solar magnetic field and resulted in particles and embryos in almost parabolic orbits, passing through the interplanetary clouds. Due m ablation of these bodies in the massive A and B clouds, and chemical interaction with the hydrogen in the latter, substantial amounts of transplanetary D-type material were deposited in the inner part of the solar system (and in the corresponding regions of the satellite systems). The distribution after transplanetary falldown and H-He diffusion indicates the possible redistribution of heavy elements into the A- and B-cloud regions and the diffusion of H and He to the C region, where light gases could be partially accreted by giant planetary embryos. The observed density distribution among the planets (see fig. 20.7.1a) reflects the compositions of the respective clouds. The terrestrial planets, forming in the A and B clouds, have higher densities than the giant planets which formed in the C cloud. Pluto and Triton have higher densities indicative of the composition of the D cloud in which they accreted.
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