SP-4012 NASA HISTORICAL DATA BOOK: VOLUME IV
NASA RESOURCES 1969-1978

 

CHAPTER TWO

NASA FACILITIES

black and white drawing illustrating the docking of the Apollo and Soyuz spacecrafts.


 

[11-13] List of Tables [see text for their respective links]
 
 
Table 2-1. Property: In-House and Contractor-Held, FY 1969-FY 1978.
Table 2-2. Value of Real Property Components as a Percentage of Total Real Property: In-House and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-3. Contractor-Held Facilities.
Table 2-4. NASA Facilities Total Investment Value, FY 1969: In-house and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-4A. NASA Facilities Total Investment Value, FY 1970-FY 1972: In-house and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-4B. NASA Facilities Total Investment Value, FY 1973-FY 1975: In-house and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-4C. NASA Facilities Total Investment Value, FY 1976-FY 1978: In-house and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-5. Land Owned by Installation and Fiscal Year in Acres: In-House and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-6. Contractor-Held Land by Installation and Fiscal Year, in Acres.
Table 2-7. Number of Buildings Owned by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-8. Number of Square Feet of Buildings Owned by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-9. Contractor-Held Buildings by Installation and Fiscal Year: Number of Buildings.
Table 2-10. Contractor-Held Buildings by Installation and Fiscal Year: Number of Square Feet.
Table 2-11. Total Real Property Value by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-12. Land Value by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-13. Buildings Value by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-14. Other Structures and Facilities Value by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-15. Capitalized Equipment Value by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-16. Land Value as a Percentage of Total Real Property Value by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-17. Buildings Value as a Percentage of Total Real Property Value by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-18. Other Structures and Facilities Value as a Percentage of Total Real Property Value by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-19. Real Property Value of Installations Ranked as a Percentage of NASA Total Real Property Values: In-House and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-20. Capitalized Equipment Value of Installations Ranked as a Percentage of NASA Total Capitalized Equipment Value.
Table 2-21. Contractor-Held Real Property Value by Installation and Fiscal Year.
Table 2-22. Contractor-Held Real Property Value as a Percentage of Total NASA Real Property Value by Installation and Fiscal Year.
Table 2-23. Contractor-Held Land Value by Installation and Fiscal Year.
Table 2-24. Contractor-Held Land Value as a Percentage of Total NASA Land Value by Installation and Fiscal Year.
Table 2-25. Contractor-Held Buildings Value by Installation and Fiscal Year.
Table 2-26. Contractor-Held Buildings Value as a Percentage of Total NASA Buildings Value by Installation and Fiscal Year.
Table 2-27. Contractor-Held Other Structures and Facilities Value by Installation and Fiscal Year.
Table 2-28. Contractor-Held Other Structures and Facilities Value as a Percentage of Total NASA Other Structures and Facilities Value by Installation and Fiscal Year.
Table 2-29. NASA Leased Facilities.
Table 2-30. NASA Tracking and Data Acquisition Stations.

 

[15] For NASA facilities, the first decade of NASA's existence was a period of rapid growth and expansion. The basic configuration of NASA installations was developed from 1958 to 1968. By the end of FY 1968, there were ten independent NASA field installations, each with its own Director. They were the Ames Research Center (ARC) at Moffett Field, California; the Electronics Research Center (ERC) in Cambridge, Massachusetts; the Flight Research Center (FRC) at Edwards Air Force Base, California; the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland; the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) near Cape Canaveral, Florida; the Langley Research Center (LaRC) at Langley Field in Hampton, Virginia; the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in Cleveland, Ohio; the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) near Houston, Texas; the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama; and the Wallops Station (WS) on Wallops Island, Virginia. In addition, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), operated in Government-owned facilities in Pasadena by the California Institute of Technology, has been under contract to NASA since NASA came into existence. Another NASA installation, the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office (SNPO) in Germantown, Maryland, with branch offices in Albuquerque, Cleveland, and Nevada, reported directly to the NASA Headquarters Office of Advanced Research and Technology. Also, several of the independent NASA centers had component installations.

The second decade of NASA's existence was for the most part a period of stability for its facilities, although several underwent changes in the years 1969 to 1978. The Electronics Research Center closed as a NASA installation on June 30, 1970, and its facilities were transferred to the Department of Transportation. Also that year, the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office was renamed the Space Nuclear Systems Office. It was disestablished in 1973. The Manned Spacecraft Center was renamed the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) on February 17, 1973. On April 14, 1974, Wallops Station was renamed the Wallops Flight Center (WFC), reflecting its expanded use as a rocket flight-test range. The same year, on June 14, 1974, the Mississippi Test Facility at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, one of the component installations of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was established as an independent NASA field installation and renamed the National Space Technology Laboratories (NSTL). On January 8, 1976, [16] the Flight Research Center was renamed the Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) in honor of the first NASA Deputy Director, who was an aeronautical research pioneer.

Whereas the first decade of NASA's existence witnessed a rapid growth in the number and size of its facilities, a comparable expansion did not take place in the second decade. Indeed, as indicated by Tables 2-1 to 2-30, the most remarkable characteristic of NASA's field installations during the second decade of NASA's existence was the lack of any significant changes. From 1959 to 1968, the land area on which NASA installations were located grew from 5,179 acres to over 142,000 acres. By 1978 the number of acres had actually decreased to just slightly over 136,000 acres. The total real property value grew from just over $268 million in 1959 to $2.4 billion in 1968; in 1978 it stood at $2.8 billion. The total investment value of NASA installations-comprising real property, leasehold improvements, capitalized equipment, and fixed assets-in-progress-rose from $4.4 billion in 1968 to $6 billion in 1978. From 1968 to 1978, investment value rose only modestly in three of the above categories but showed a marked increase in capitalized equipment value from $1.4 billion in 1968 to $2.9 billion in 1978.

Attainment of stability in the NASA system of installations is further evidenced by comparing proportional changes that make up the total real property value. Whereas the value of buildings changed from almost 92 percent of the total in 1959 to close to 54 percent in 1968, it remained almost steady during the next decade, rising to only slightly less than 56 percent in 1978. Similarly, the value of other structures and facilities rose from about 8 percent of the total in 1959 to almost 42 percent in 1968, and in the next decade it changed by only 2 percent, attaining the figure of 40 percent in 1978. The value of NASA-owned land was 0.3 percent of the total in 1959, 4.3 percent in 1968, and 4.1 percent of the total real property value in 1978.

 

Definition of Terms

Definitions of the terms used in this chapter were taken from NASA Management Instructions (NMIs) and NASA Handbook (NHB) Approval of Facility Projects 1.

Buildings. Facilities with the basic function of enclosing usable space. This category of real property includes buildings leased by or on behalf of NASA and improvements to NASA-owned buildings and installed property but excludes leaseholds improvements (NMI 8800.1A).

Note: In the tables of this chapter and those of Chapter Six, the square footage of buildings leased does not include GSA-leased buildings.

[17] Component Installation. An installation, office, or other NASA organizational element that is located geographically apart from a NASA installation and that, pursuant to delegations from the Administrator, is assigned for management purposes to the Official-in-Charge of a Headquarters office, the Director of a field installation, or an immediate subordinate of these officials (NMI 1132.2A).

 

Component installations of NASA Headquarters include:

NASA Pasadena Office

The Space Nuclear Propulsion Office/Space Nuclear Systems Office was organizationally under the NASA Headquarters Office of Advanced Research and Technology and in some cases was regarded as a component installation.

Former component installations of NASA Headquarters include:

NASA Daytona Beach Operation
NASA Office-Downey
North Eastern Office
Western Coordination Office
Western Operations Office
Western Support Office

Component installations of centers include:

Kennedy Space Center-Western Test Range Operations Division
Lewis Research Center-Plum Brook Station
Manned Spacecraft Center-White Sands Test Facility
Marshall Space Flight Center-Michoud Assembly Facility with its Computer Operations Office; Mississippi Test Facility (until June 14, 1974, when it became the independent National Space Technology Laboratories); and Slidell Computer Facility

 

Easement. An acquired privilege or right of use or enjoyment that one party may have in the land of another, for example, an easement or right-of-way for road or highway purposes or for construction and maintenance of utility lines (NHB 7330.1, 26).

Equipment. Personal property that meets all of the following criteria: (a) has an estimated service life of one year or more, (b) has an initial acquisition cost of $50 or more per unit, (c) retains its identity when put into use, and (d) will not be consumed during an experiment (NHB 7330.1, 26-27).

Collateral Equipment. All nonintegral, severable equipment that is acquired for use, or is used, in a facility. Collateral equipment is not required to make the structure or building useful and operable as a structure or building, but it imparts to the facility its particular character at the time, for example, furniture in an office building or test equipment in a test stand (NHB 7330.1, 25). See Personal Property.

Integral Equipment. Equipment that is normally required to make a facility useful and operable as a facility and that is built in or permanently affixed to it in such a manner that removal would impair the usefulness, safety, or comfort of the facility. Integral equipment includes such items [18] as elevators, central air-conditioning systems, and electrical and plumbing fixtures and equipment (NHB 7330.1, 28). See Installed Property.

Note: As used in this chapter and in Chapter Six, equipment refers to capitalized equipment only. (To be recorded as capitalized equipment, the equipment must have an estimated service life of more than one year, be identifiable as equipment when in use and not part of other equipment, generally cost $200 or more, and not be intended to be consumed in an experiment. Noncapitalized equipment is charged to the appropriate cost account as "expensed equipment." )

Facility. A generic term used to encompass real property and related integral and collateral equipment of a capital nature; thus the term does not encompass operating materials, supplies, and noncapitalized equipment. The term "facility" is used in connection with land, buildings (facilities with the basic function of enclosing usable space), structures (facilities with the basic function of a research or operational tool or activity), and other real property improvements (NHB 7330.1, 27).

Field Installation. A NASA organizational element located geographically apart from NASA Headquarters and headed by a Director. The following are NASA field installations:

Ames Research Center
Electronics Research Center, disestablished June 30, 1970
Flight Research Center/Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research
Center, as of January 8, 1976
Goddard Space Flight Center
John F. Kennedy Space Center
Langley Research Center
Lewis Research Center
Manned Spacecraft Center/Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, as of February 17, 1973
George C. Marshall Space Flight Center
National Space Technology Laboratories
Wallops Station/Wallops Flight Center, as of April 14, 1974

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is not a NASA field installation but is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract to NASA.

The Space Nuclear Propulsion Office/Space Nuclear Systems Office was not a NASA field installation but reported to the NASA Headquarters Office of Advanced Research and Technology.

Industrial Facility. NASA property that is contractor held. Figures for industrial property are included with NASA's in-house property in all tables, unless otherwise noted.

Installation. A NASA organizational element, including both Headquarters and field installations (NMI 1132.2A).

Installed Property. Items of fixtures and equipment normally required [19] for the functional use of a building or structure, the removal of which would impair the usefulness, comfort, and safety of the building or structure. Installed property is included as part of the building or structure and is accounted for accordingly. Examples of installed property items included as real property are plumbing fixtures and equipment, electrical and fixed fire protection systems, overhead crane runways, components that become part of a system, and other similar built-in or permanently affixed items (NMI 8800.1A). See Integral Equipment.

Investment Value, Total. A figure representing the total of (a) real property value, including land, buildings, and other structures and facilities; (b) leasehold improvements value; (c) capitalized equipment value; and (d) assets-in-progress value. Value is based on cost plus improvements.

Note: As used in Chapter Two, total investment value includes both in-house and contractor-held facilities.

Land. A category of real property that includes all acquired interests in land (for example, owned, leased, or acquired by permit) but excludes NASA-controlled easements and rights-of-way that are under leasehold improvements (NMI 8800.1A).

Note: As used in the tables of Chapters Two and Six, land includes only NASA-owned land unless otherwise noted. Figures presented for this variable do not include leased land or land held under use permit or agreement. NASA-owned land means Government-owned land for which NASA has custody and accountability.

Lease. An instrument conveying land, buildings, or other structures or facilities or portions thereof for a specified term of time, in consideration of payment of a rental fee (NHB 7330.1, 28).

Leasehold Improvements. Improvements made by or on behalf of NASA to leased land, buildings, or other structures and facilities; easements and rights-of-way (NMI 8800.1A).

Note: Although NASA Management Instruction 8800.1A deems leasehold improvements a category of real property, they are considered as a separate component of total investment value in Chapter Two.

Other Structures and Facilities. Category of real property that includes facilities having the basic function of research or operational tools or activities as distinct from buildings, which have the primary function of enclosing usable space. Includes all structures and facilities and installed property owned or leased by or on behalf of NASA, for example, storage tanks, gantry cranes, launch pads, blockhouses, airfield pavements, roads, monuments, sidewalks, parking areas, and fences. Excludes leasehold improvements (NMI 8800.1A).

Personal Property. Items of equipment that are installed in a building or structure to perform or assist in performing the operation housed within the buildings or structures and that, if removed, would retain their identity and usefulness as individual items of equipment, for example, a machine tool installed in a building (NMI 8800.1A). See Collateral Equipment.

Real Property. Land, buildings, structures, and utilities systems and their improvements and appurtenances, permanently annexed to land. Real [20] property includes equipment attached to and made a part of buildings, structures, and other facilities (such as heating systems) but excludes collateral equipment (such as machine tools) that is removable without significant damage to the real property (NHB 7330.1, 29).

Real property-when under the control of the United States or of any instrumentality, entity, or wholly owned corporation of the United States-means any interest in land, excluding lands in the Public Domain or reserved or dedicated for National Forest or National Park purposes, and any fixture, structure, appurtenance, or other improvement permanently annexed to land, including lands to which the United States has no title or interest and lands in the Public Domain or dedicated or devoted to National Forest or National Park purposes (NMI 8800.1A).

Note: In the tables of Chapters Two and Six, total real property value is the sum of land value, buildings value, and other structures and facilities value. Leasehold improvements are not included in total real property value but are considered as a separate component of total investment value.

Use Permit. A document conferring temporary permission to NASA to use land, buildings, structures, or other facilities for which another Government agency has custody and accountability.

 

NASA Installations and Abbreviations

For installation summaries, see Chapter Six.

Ames Research Center (ARC)
Electronics Research Center (ERC), disestablished June 30, 1970
Flight Research Center (FRC)/Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC)
Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)
John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC)
Langley Research Center (LaRC)
Lewis Research Center (LeRC)
Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC)/Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC)
George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)
National Space Technology Laboratories (NSTL)
Space Nuclear Propulsion Office (SNPO)/Space Nuclear Systems Office (SNSO)
Wallops Station (WS)/Wallops Flight Center (WFC)
Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)
NASA Headquarters (Hq.)

 

[21] Table 2-1. Property: In-House and Contractor-Held, FY 1969-FY 1978.
[22-23] Table 2-2. Value of Real Property Components as a Percentage of Total Real Property: In-House and Contractor-Held.
[24] Table 2-3. Contractor-Held Facilities.
[25] Table 2-4. NASA Facilities Total Investment Value, FY 1969: In-house and Contractor-Held.
[26] Table 2-4A. NASA Facilities Total Investment Value, FY 1970-FY 1972: In-house and Contractor-Held.
[27-29] Table 2-4B. NASA Facilities Total Investment Value, FY 1973-FY 1975: In-house and Contractor-Held.
[30-31] Table 2-4C. NASA Facilities Total Investment Value, FY 1976-FY 1978: In-house and Contractor-Held.
 
 

[
32]

Aerial view if the Western Test Range Operations Division at the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The Western Test Range Operations Division is a component installation if the Kennedy Space Center.

Aerial view if the Western Test Range Operations Division at the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The Western Test Range Operations Division is a component installation if the Kennedy Space Center.

 

The Space Power Facility at the Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio is a component installation of the Lewis Research Center. It has many uses, from testing space vehicles to creating clouds for study purposes.

The Space Power Facility at the Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio is a component installation of the Lewis Research Center. It has many uses, from testing space vehicles to creating clouds for study purposes.


 
 
[33] Table 2-5. Land Owned by Installation and Fiscal Year in Acres: In-House and Contractor-Held.
[34] Table 2-6. Contractor-Held Land by Installation and Fiscal Year, in Acres.
[35] Table 2-7. Number of Buildings Owned by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
[36] Table 2-8. Number of Square Feet of Buildings Owned by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
[37] Table 2-9. Contractor-Held Buildings by Installation and Fiscal Year: Number of Buildings.
[38] Table 2-10. Contractor-Held Buildings by Installation and Fiscal Year: Number of Square Feet.
[39] Table 2-11. Total Real Property Value by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
[40] Table 2-12. Land Value by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
[41] Table 2-13. Buildings Value by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
[42] Table 2-14. Other Structures and Facilities Value by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
[43] Table 2-15. Capitalized Equipment Value by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.

 


[
44]

A flight model of the second stage of the Saturn V is being hoisted into its test stand at the Mississippi Test Facility, a component installation of Marshall Space Flight Center.

A flight model of the second stage of the Saturn V is being hoisted into its test stand at the Mississippi Test Facility, a component installation of Marshall Space Flight Center.

 

[45] Table 2-16. Land Value as a Percentage of Total Real Property Value by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
[46] Table 2-17. Buildings Value as a Percentage of Total Real Property Value by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
[47] Table 2-18. Other Structures and Facilities Value as a Percentage of Total Real Property Value by Installation and Fiscal Year: In-House and Contractor-Held.
[48] Table 2-19. Real Property Value of Installations Ranked as a Percentage of NASA Total Real Property Values: In-House and Contractor-Held.
Table 2-20. Capitalized Equipment Value of Installations Ranked as a Percentage of NASA Total Capitalized Equipment Value.
[49] Table 2-21. Contractor-Held Real Property Value by Installation and Fiscal Year.
[50] Table 2-22. Contractor-Held Real Property Value as a Percentage of Total NASA Real Property Value by Installation and Fiscal Year.
[51] Table 2-23. Contractor-Held Land Value by Installation and Fiscal Year.
[52] Table 2-24. Contractor-Held Land Value as a Percentage of Total NASA Land Value by Installation and Fiscal Year.
[53] Table 2-25. Contractor-Held Buildings Value by Installation and Fiscal Year.
[54] Table 2-26. Contractor-Held Buildings Value as a Percentage of Total NASA Buildings Value by Installation and Fiscal Year.
[55] Table 2-27. Contractor-Held Other Structures and Facilities Value by Installation and Fiscal Year.
[56] Table 2-28. Contractor-Held Other Structures and Facilities Value as a Percentage of Total NASA Other Structures and Facilities Value by Installation and Fiscal Year.
[57] Table 2-29. NASA Leased Facilities.
Table 2-30. NASA Tracking and Data Acquisition Stations.
 

1 NASA, Office of Organization and Management, Administrative Services Division, NASA Management Instruction (NMI) 8800.1A and 1132.2A; and NASA Handbook (NHB) 7330.1, Approval of Facility Projects.

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