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Apollo 11

Day 9: Re-entry and Splashdown

Corrected Transcript and Commentary Copyright © 2010-2011 by W. David Woods, Kenneth D. MacTaggart and Frank O'Brien. All rights reserved.
Last updated 2017-02-10
[The crew of Apollo 11 waken about five hours before splashdown, to be told that the final Midcourse Correction in the Flight Plan, the seventh, is cancelled. They photograph the Earth as it expands rapidly in the windows of their spacecraft. The Service Module is jettisoned and the crew see it maneuvering away automatically. Re-entry is followed by a safe splashdown in the Pacific Ocean southwest of Hawaii.]

[MP3 audio file. 5,361 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

PAO: This is Apollo Control at 189 hours, 28 minutes. Apollo 11 is 40,961 nautical miles [75,860 km] from the Earth, approaching at a velocity of 9,671 feet per second [2,948 m/s]. Mid-Course Correction number 7 has been cancelled, and as a result we will let the crew sleep until an elapsed time of 190 hours. Weather in the recovery area... Well, we're getting a call from Apollo 11, now. Let's listen to that.

189:28:35 Armstrong: Hello, Houston. Apollo 11.

189:28:39 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Go.

189:28:43 Armstrong: Roger. Good morning. What's the status on Mid-Course 7?

189:28:47 Evans: Roger. We were going to let you sleep in until about 190 hours. Mid-Course 7 is not required.

189:28:54 Armstrong: Okay. Thank you.

[Very long comm break.]
PAO: The crew gave us a call at 189 hours, 29 minutes. We advised them of the cancellation of the Mid-Course Correction. Weather in the recovery area: skies will be partly cloudy. Cloud base is at 2,000 feet scattered. Wind, east north east at 18 knots. 6-foot sea. Temperature near 80 degrees [27°C]. This landing area is 215 miles [400 km] to the northeast from the original landing area, moved because of thunder showers in the original area. This new location should allow the recovery ship USS Hornet to arrive in Hawaii 4 to 5 hours earlier than originally planned. We expect that it may be possible for the carrier to arrive at Pearl Harbor somewhere between 8 and 9 o'clock, on July 26th, that's Saturday.

PAO: The crew is probably preparing breakfast now and it's not likely that we'll hear a lot from them in the - right away, but we'll continue to stay up live for any conversation.

PAO: Visibility in the recovery area is 10 miles [18.5 km].

PAO: Clock shows we're 5½ hours away from Entry Interface, the point at which Apollo 11 will enter the Earth's atmosphere. That's scheduled to occur at an elapsed time of 195 hours, 3 minutes, 7 seconds. We expect landing at 195 hours, 17 minutes, 49 seconds.

[MP3 audio file. 285 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control. Apollo 11 is now 38,793 nautical miles [71,845 km] from the Earth. Velocity; 9,947 feet per second [3,032 m/s].
[MP3 audio file. 302 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control at 190 hours, 10 minutes. Apollo 11's distance from the Earth, 36,956 nautical miles [68,443 km]. Velocity, 10,195 feet per second [3,107 m/s].
[MP3 audio file. 5,517 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
190:19:07 Evans: Apollo 11. Good morning from Houston. Over.

190:19:12 Armstrong: Good morning, 11.

190:19:15 Evans: Roger. We saw you're up, stirring around, and we thought you're probably eating your breakfast there. Just in general, we'll probably start coming up with the uplink of the state vectors and the target loads and what have you at about 190:50, somewhere in that area, and get you started to work.

190:19:35 Armstrong: Okay.

190:19:36 Evans: And in the meantime, while you're eating your breakfast there, I've got the Maroon Bugle all standing by here to give you the morning news.

190:19:45 Armstrong: Glad to hear it.

190:19:48 Evans: Okay. Apollo 11 remains the prime story with the world awaiting your landing today at about 11:49 a.m. Houston time. In Washington, House tax reformers have fashioned a provision which would make it impossible for wealthy individuals to avoid income tax entirely through tax-free investments or special allowances. Under the proposal tentatively adopted by the House Ways and Means Committee, everyone would pay taxes on at least half of their income.

190:20:25 Armstrong: Hang on a minute.

190:20:30 Evans: Roger. Standing by.

[Comm break.]
190:22:28 Armstrong: Okay. Okay, Ron. We're ready to go again. Thank you.

190:22:36 Evans: Roger. Continuing with the Maroon Bugle. President Nixon surprised your wives with a phone call from San Francisco just before he boarded a plane to fly out to meet you. All of them were very touched by your television broadcast. Jan and Pat watched from Mission Control here. The launch of Intelsat from the Cape was postponed for the fourth time last night. The problem was said to be a malfunctioning nitrogen regulator in the second stage of the Delta. A new attempt will be made to launch it tonight. The research submarine Ben Franklin, which is studying the Gulf Stream, set a record by drifting 24 hours from 10 to 100 feet above the ocean floor in 1300 feet of water off the Georgia coast. The mission is lead by Jacques Piccard. Wally Schirra has been elected to a five-year term on the Board of Trustees of the Detroit Institute of Technology. He will serve on the Institute's development committee. Air Canada says it has accepted 2,300 reservations for flights to the Moon in the past five days. It might be noted that more than 100 have been made by men for their mothers-in-law. And finally it appears that rather than killing romantic songs about the Moon, you have inspired hundreds of song writers. Nashville, Tennessee, which probably houses the largest collection of recording companies and song publishers in the country, now reports it is being flooded by Moon songs. Some will make it. The song at the top of the best sellers list this week is, "In the year 2525." Morning Bugle. Out.

['In the Year 2525 (Exordium and Terminus)' was written by Rick Evans in 1964 and became a hit for Zager and Evans, a musical duo from Nebraska, in July 1969.]
190:24:51 Armstrong: Thank you very much, Ron.
[Long comm break.]

[MP3 audio file. 3,061 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

190:31:42 Armstrong: Houston, crew status report: 5.5, 7, 5.5.
[These numbers are the crew's report on their sleep hours, in the order CDR, CMP, LMP.]
190:31:52 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Roger. We copy. And I have your consumables update, if you're ready to copy.

190:32:00 Armstrong: Go ahead.

190:32:01 Evans: Roger. GET 189 plus 00: RCS total, minus 1 percent; Alpha, minus 11; Bravo, plus 10; Charlie, minus 1; Delta, minus 1. H2 total, minus 0.76 pounds; oxygen total, plus 17.6 pounds. Over.

190:32:41 Armstrong: Okay. It doesn't look like we're going to be able to get quite back on the Flight Plan.

190:32:46 Evans: Not quite. Just about, though.

[Very long comm break.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control at 190 hours, 34 minutes. Apollo 11's distance from the Earth; 34,622 nautical miles [64,120 km]. Velocity; 10,534 feet per second [3,211 m/s].
[MP3 audio file. 7,286 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
190:45:13 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Request P00 and Accept, and we'll send you a REFSMMAT, state vector, and entry target load. Over.

190:45:23 Armstrong: You have it.

190:45:29 Evans: Roger. It'll be coming up.

[Comm break.]
190:48:04 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Can you tell us where the visor assemblies ended up, there?

190:48:12 Armstrong: We're going to follow your suggestion and stow them under the right-hand couch.

190:48:17 Evans: Roger. Mighty fine. Break. The weather forecast in the landing area right now is 2,000 scattered, high scattered, 10 miles. The wind about 080 at 18 knots. You'll have about 3- to 6-foot waves. Your Delta-H is plus 10 feet. And it looks like you'll be landing about 10 minutes before sunrise. Over.

190:48:49 Armstrong: Okay. Sounds good.

190:48:52 Evans: Roger.

[Comm break.]
190:50:31 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. All three loads are in. The computer is yours. Over.

190:50:38 Collins: Roger.

190:50:40 Evans: And Mike, if you're on loop there, to extend the range and the constant-g re-entry, here, I've got a little procedure, if you would like to listen to it.

190:50:56 Collins: Stand by one.

190:50:57 Evans: Roger.

190:51:01 Collins: I'm right in the middle of my orange juice. Be with you in about 5 minutes.

190:51:04 Evans: Sure, no problem, standing by.

[Comm break.]
190:52:24 Aldrin: Houston, Apollo 11. Hey, Ron, I wonder if you could give us a good Navy explanation for this Delta-H term. Over.

190:52:35 Evans: Roger. Let me think about it, and I'll come back.

190:52:38 Aldrin: You too, huh?

190:52:41 Evans: (Laughter) Right.

190:52:48 Aldrin: Collins has got one, but I'm not sure I buy it.

[Long comm break.]

[MP3 audio file. 2,564 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

PAO: This is Apollo Control at 190 hours, 56 minutes. Apollo 11's distance from Earth; 32,447 nautical miles [60,092 km]. Velocity; 10,876 feet per second [3,315 m/s].

190:58:16 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston.

190:58:21 Aldrin: Go ahead.

190:58:22 Evans: Roger, 11. We don't have to worry about it any more. The altimeter out there is now standard, 29.92. But basically what it means is that if I give you a plus 10 feet, for instance, that means that you will hit the water with the altimeter reading 10 feet. Over.

190:58:41 Collins: All right.

190:58:43 Aldrin: Ah, Collins was wrong.

[Very long comm break.]

[MP3 audio file. 372 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

PAO: This is Apollo Control at 191 hours, 15 minutes. Apollo 11 is now 30,469 nautical miles [56,429 km] from Earth, approaching at a velocity of 11,221 feet per second [3,420 m/s].
[MP3 audio file. 345 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control at 191 hours, 38 minutes. Apollo 11's distance from Earth now 27,979 nautical miles [51,817 km]. Velocity; 11,689 feet per second [3,563 m/s].
[MP3 audio file. 9,109 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
191:43:31 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. I have your entry PAD. Over. [Pause.]

191:43:42 Armstrong: Stand by.

191:43:46 Evans: Roger. Standing by. [Pause.]

191:43:54 Armstrong: Okay, I'm ready to copy.

191:43:57 Evans: Roger. Entry PAD: area is the mid-Pacific, roll, 000, 152, 001; GET 194:46:06, 267; latitude, plus 13.32, minus 169.17; 06.4; 36194, 6.49; range to go, 1404.5, 36275; 195:03:06, 00:28, DL max, 1.54, 0.84, 22400, 18000; D0 4.00, 02:13; 00:17, 03:51, 09:02; sextant star, 45, 018.9, 27.7; boresight star, none available; lift vector, Up. Comments: GDC align, Vega and Deneb, roll 078, pitch 223, yaw 340. Additional comments: Use non-exit EMS pattern; EI minus 30 horizon check, GET 194:33:06; pitch 298. You'll get P65, but no P66. Additional note: Initial bank angle in P67 may not be full lift. Apollo 11, Houston. Read back. [Long pause.]

191:48:46 Armstrong: Okay, Ron. For MIDPAC: 000, 152, 001; 194:46:06, 267; plus 13.32, minus 169.17; 06.4; 36194, 6.49; 1404.5, 36275; 195:03:06, 0028, 1.54, 0.84, 2240, 180, 4.00, 02:13; 00:17, 03:51, 09:02; 45, 018.9, 27.7; none available; lift vector, Up; GDC align, Vega and Deneb, roll 078, pitch 223, yaw 340. Use non-exit EMS. EI minus 30 horizon check, 194:33:06, pitch 298. Initial bank angle in P67 may not be full lift, and we will get P65 but no P66.

[This is the final Entry PAD. It is interpreted as follows:

Purpose: Entry.

Landing target: The landing target is in the Mid-Pacific.

IMU gimbal angles required for trim at 0.05g: Roll, 0°; pitch, 150°; yaw, 1°.

Time of the horizon check: 194 hours, 46 minutes, 6 seconds GET.

Spacecraft pitch at horizon check: 267°. This is 17 minutes before time of entry.

Splashdown point (Noun 61): 13.32° north latitude, 169.17° west longitude.

Maximum number of g's during entry: 6.4.

Velocity at Entry Interface (400,000 feet altitude, Noun 60): 36,194 feet/second (11,032 metres/second).

Entry flight path angle at Entry Interface: 6.49°.

Range to go to splashdown point from 0.05g event: 1,404.5 nautical miles (2,601.1 km).

Predicted inertial velocity at 0.05g event: 36,275 feet/second (11,057 metres/second).

Time of Entry Interface: 195 hours, 3 minutes, 6 seconds GET.

Time from Entry Interface to 0.05g event: 0:28 (seconds).

The next four items relate to the g-forces and velocities that pertain to the skip-out maneuver that this entry will perform.

Maximum drag level at skip-out maneuver (Noun 69): 1.54g

Minimum drag level at skip-out maneuver (Noun 69): 0.84g

Maximum skip-out velocity: 22,400 feet/second (~6,800 metres/second)

Minimum skip-out velocity: 18,000 feet/second (~5,500 metres/second)

Planned drag level (deceleration) during the constant g phase: 4.00g.

Time from Entry Interface until their velocity slows sufficiently to allow a circular orbit around the Earth: 2:13.

The practical implication of this is that this is the "capture point" where the CM cannot exit on an orbit around Earth. It is bound to reach the surface on this pass.

Time from Entry Interface that the communications blackout begins: 0:17.

Time from Entry Interface that the communications blackout ends: 3:51.

Time from Entry Interface that the drogue parachutes will deploy: 9:02.

Sextant star: 45 (Fomalhaut, Alpha Piscis Austrini.)

Sextant shaft angle at Entry Interface minus 2 minutes: 18.9°.

Sextant trunnion angle at Entry Interface minus 2 minutes: 27.7°.

The crew will not make an additional attitude check made using the COAS sighted on a star so the next three items are not applicable.

Lift vector at Entry Interface: Up.

Comments in addition to the PAD:

If the IMU fails and they need to have a backup alignment on the Gyro Display Couplers, then they should use stars Vega and Deneb. Aligning to them would represent the following attitude; roll, 078; pitch, 223; yaw, 340. Although they are extending the length of the entry by invoking the skip-out software, they will not be exiting the atmosphere so therefore they should use the part of the EMS scroll that pertains to a non-exit entry. When making a check of the horizon angle 30 minutes prior to Entry Interface, their pitch angle should be 298°. In a conventional entry, P64 is followed by P67. For a skip-out re-entry, P65 and 66 are employed to handle the exit and entry parts of the skip. In this case, because they are extending the re-entry but not actually skipping out, P66 will not be invoked and instead, P65 will lead directly to P67. The crew are also informed that they may not be in a full-lift (heads-down) attitude when they enter P67.]

191:50:30 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Roger. On your GDC align pitch, it should be 233, 233 in the pitch. Over.

191:50:41 Aldrin: Okay. I've got a 233.

191:50:47 Evans: Also your VL and - and Max and Min, I'm sure, are 22,400 and 18,000. Over.

191:50:56 Aldrin: Yeah. That's right.

191:50:58 Evans: Okay. If you'll dig out your entry checklist there on page E6-1, I'll update your Retro times there for the various altitudes. Over.

191:51:10 Aldrin: Okay. Go ahead.

191:51:14 Evans: Okay. On page E6-1, your RRT is 07:20, your 50k is 08:16; 40k is 08:30; your 24k is 09:02; and your 10k is 09:51. Over.

191:52:06 Armstrong: Okay. RRT, 07:20; 50,000, 08:16. That's - 07:20 is - is the time the steam pressure's pegged from RRT; and 40,000, 08:30; 24,000, 09:02; 10,000, 09:51.

191:52:48 Evans: 11, Houston. You started out right, and then the numbers you read back were correct, but I didn't get your comment in between there.

191:52:58 Armstrong: I assume that - all I want to know is that first time, 07:20, that's the time of steam pressure peg. Right?

191:53:04 Evans: That's affirmative.

191:53:06 Armstrong: Okay.

[Long comm break.]

[MP3 audio file. 4,960 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

191:58:05 Collins: Houston, Apollo 11. Ron, I'm ready to copy your message about the constant drag level.

191:58:13 Evans: Okay, Mike. Of course, this is in the event the G&N and the EMS quits and you have to fly the constant-g; and what we're trying to do is to extend the constant-g range from 1,100 to 1,500 miles. We've run this procedure in the simulator, and it works fine. Basically, I'll go through it - just go through it, and then if you have any questions, come back. But it's the same lift vector up until Max g, and then lift vector down, and then modulate the lift vector until g-dot goes to zero. Okay, this procedure is essentially the same so far. And then hold g-dot zero until you pass the Retro elapsed time of V-circular; and then after you pass this Retro elapsed time of V-circular, roll to a gimbal angle of 45 degrees, and then hold this constant bank angle of 45 degrees until you come to the Retro elapsed time of drogues. Over.

191:59:44 Collins: Okay. It sounds straightforward enough. Understand constant-g backup - back-up procedure, lift vector up until Max g and then lift vector down, then modulate until bank angle until g-dot equals zero. Maintain g-dot equals zero until subcircular, then roll 45 degrees and hold until drogue time. Over.

192:00:07 Evans: Okay. That's mighty fine, Mike. That's correct.

[Very long comm break.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control at 192 hours, 2 minutes. This will be first time in Apollo that crews have flown 'lift vector Up' during reentry. Normally, lift vector is Down. However, we want to extend the range by 215 miles [400 km] so for a short period, about a minute and 24 - 25 seconds during the blackout period, the spacecraft will be flown with lift vector Up. The computer program for that is number 65, Up control. Apollo 11 is now 25,301 nautical miles [46,857 km] from Earth, velocity has increased to 12,263 feet per second [3,738 m/s].
[MP3 audio file. 420 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control at 192 hours, 30 minutes. Apollo 11 now 22,130 nautical miles [40,985 km] from Earth. Velocity; 13,053 feet per second [3,979 km]. We're 2 hours, 32 minutes, 32 seconds away from Entry Interface.
[MP3 audio file. 4,127 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control at 192 hours, 48 minutes. Apollo 11 is 19,914 nautical miles [36,881 km] from the Earth approaching at a velocity of 13,695 feet per second [4,174 m/s]. We're 2 hours, 14 minutes, 16 seconds away from entry into the atmosphere. And a U.S. Air Force C-135 crew will attempt to photograph this re-entry of the Command Module. Aircraft designated ALOTS, for 'airborne light-weight optical tracker system', will attempt to record the entry on 70-millimeter still film. Pilot of that aircraft is the ARIA Squadron Commander. Three of his ARIA aircraft will be in the entry area to provide communications during re-entry of the Command Module. Crew of ALOTS includes the aircraft Commander, Colonel Robert W. Hoffman of Wichita Falls, Texas. The pilot, who is the ARIA Squadron Commander, Colonel Oakley W. Baron of Kankakee, Illinois. Co-Pilot Lt. Col. Wallace L. Emory, San Angelo, Texas. Navigators are Lt. Col. Ervin O. Stewart, Jr., Greensboro, North Carolina, and Major Charles W. Hinton, Mt. Auburn, Illinois. The Photographic Specialist, Master Sergeant Paul T. Swieczkowski whose home town is not listed. Colonel Baron's nickname is the Red Baron who is a veteran of more than 10,000 flying hours, and has flown more than 80 different types of aircraft.

PAO: Normally the Mission Control Center here in Houston will not attempt to contact Apollo 11 after drogue chute deployment. We will stay off the air and let the recovery forces attempt to establish voice contact. If for some reason, CapCom does want to communicate with the crew, he will request clearance from the recovery forces before putting in a call.

[MP3 audio file. 1,912 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control at 192 hours, 55 minutes. A few of the entry event times have changed from a second to 4 seconds. Others remain the same. Here's the updated times: Entry, 195 hours, 3 minutes, 7 seconds; begin blackout, 195:03:25; 05g, 195:03:36; end blackout, 195:07:00; drogue chute deployment, 195:12:08; main chute deployment, 195:12:56; landing 195:17:53. Maximum g-load expected during entry, 6.20.
[MP3 audio file. 6,131 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
193:01:57 Collins: This entry time line is my kind of time line. Nice and slow.

193:02:03 Evans: Okay, 11. Houston. Roger. It sure is. EECOM is anxiously awaiting his big moment here for the logic sequence check whenever you're ready.

193:02:14 Collins: Okay. We'll be ready for that in just a flash.

193:02:17 Evans: Roger. [Pause.]

193:02:28 Lovell: Apollo 11, Houston.

193:02:31 Collins: Go ahead, Ron.

193:02:32 Lovell: This is Jim, Mike. Backup crew is still standing by. I just want to remind you that the most difficult part of your mission is going to be after recovery.

[Another example of Jim Lovell's teasing humour.]
193:02:42 Collins: Well, we're looking forward to all parts of it.

193:02:45 Lovell: Please don't sneeze. [Pause.]

193:02:53 Collins: Yeah, keep the mice healthy. [Pause.]

[The mice will be used to test the toxicity of lunar soil samples.]

[On the available PAO audio recording, a loud voice comes in over the top of Mike's next two lines, apparently calling for Neil. Journal reader, Andrew Rodland, suggests it may be 'Bill' as other astronauts, including Bill Anders, gather at the Capcom console.]

193:03:03 Collins: The Earth is really getting bigger up here and, of course, we see a crescent.

193:03:12 Collins: We've been taking pictures and we've still got four exposures to go, and we'll take those and then pack the camera.

[Comm break.]
PAO: And the Apollo 11 backup crew has joined CapCom Ron Evans at his console; Jim Lovell, Bill Anders and Fred Haise. Also Donald K. Slayton, Director of Flight Crew Operations, is at that console.

193:05:18 Collins: Houston, Apollo 11. We're ready for the logic check whenever you are. We're standing by to arm the logic. We've got the ELS logic on, ELS Auto, and all the circuit breakers in.

193:05:30 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Roger. You can press on with the SECS logic.

193:05:35 Collins: Okay. Logic 1 coming on.

193:05:37 Collins: Mark it.

193:05:39 Collins: Logic 2 coming on.

193:05:40 Collins: Mark it. [Pause.]

193:05:50 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Logic checks good. You're Go for Pyro Arm.

193:05:56 Collins: Thank you, sir.

[Comm break.]
193:07:09 Aldrin: Houston, Apollo 11 has got VHF A Simplex on whenever you want to make a Comm check.

193:07:20 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Roger. You faded out a little bit there, Buzz. I understand you have the VHF Simplex A on now. Is that correct? Over.

193:07:29 Aldrin: That affirmative. VHF Simplex A and we're TR on VHF.

193:07:35 Evans: Roger. Mighty fine. We'll watch it as you are coming on in and let you know when the intelligibility is up and we'll make a voice check with you at that time. [Pause.]

193:07:50 Collins: Houston, Apollo 11. I've been holding here in SCS control, Minimum Deadband, Rate Low with the limit cycle on, just as a matter of curiosity, if you guys wanted some fuel numbers from that.

193:08:07 Evans: 11, Houston. Roger. We copy and we've been figuring it out.

193:08:13 Collins: Okay.

193:08:18 Collins: It's a pleasure to be able to waste gas.

193:08:23 Evans: Roger. That's affirmative.

[Long comm break.]

[MP3 audio file. 328 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

PAO: This is Apollo Control at 193 hours, 10 minutes. Apollo 11 now 17,158 nautical miles [31,777 km] from Earth. Velocity; 14,633 feet per second [4,460 m/s].
[MP3 audio file. 726 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
193:16:11 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston with a little Recovery Force information. Over.

193:16:17 Collins: Go ahead.

193:16:18 Evans: Roger. The Hornet is on station just far enough off the target point to keep from getting hit. Recovery 1, or the chopper's there; they're on station. And Hawaii Rescue 1 and 2, the C-130s, are within 40 minutes of your target point. Over. [Pause.]

193:16:50 Collins: Sounds good. Thank you.

[Long comm break.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control at 193 hours, 20 minutes. Apollo 11; 15,854 nautical miles [29,362 km] from Earth. Velocity; 15,154 feet per second [4,619 m/s]. We're just - we're 1 hour, 43 minutes away from entry and here are the altitudes at which the entry events are expected to occur: Entry at 75 statute miles [121 km]; beginning blackout at 62 statute miles [100 km]; 05g, 57 statute miles [92 km]; end blackout, 41 statute miles [66 km]; drogue chute deployment, 23,300 feet [7,100 metres] and main chute deployment, 10,500 feet [3,200 metres].

193:25:08 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston.

193:25:11 Armstrong: Go ahead.

193:25:13 Evans: Roger. Just to get a little downlink here to check out our VHF. I show us about an hour and 37 minutes, approximately, from Entry Interface. Over.

193:25:26 Aldrin: Okay. That's about right.

193:25:28 Evans: Okay. Looks like we're together on that, and I guess we're standing by for you to whip into the entry attitude.

193:25:37 Aldrin: Okay. We've just been taking a couple of last minute pictures. We've finished the EMS entry check, primary water EVAP activation.

193:25:46 Evans: Roger. Mighty fine.

[Long comm break.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control at 193 hours, 30 minutes. Apollo 11 now 14,374 nautical miles [26,621 km] from Earth. Velocity; 15,788 [feet per second, 4,812 metres per second]. We expect entry velocity at 36,194 feet per second [11,032 m/s].

193:31:22 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston.

193:31:26 Collins: Go ahead.

193:31:28 Evans: Roger, Mike. We recommend the left VHF antenna for VHF.

193:31:33 Evans: And this is your friendly backup CMP. Have a good trip, and ma... [garbled: 'make sure you'?] remember to come in BEF.

[BEF - Blunt end forward. The correct orientation for the Command Module during re-entry, and another piece of astronaut humour.]
193:31:42 Collins: You better believe. Thank you kindly.

PAO: CapCom that time was Fred Haise, the backup Lunar Module Pilot.

193:31:48 Collins: We can see the Moon passing by the window and it looks what I consider to be a correct size.

[Comm break.]
193:33:26 Aldrin: Houston, Apollo 11. Like to switch to S-band Omni C. I just did a minute ago, and noticed a loss of signal strength, over.

193:33:34 Evans: Roger, Apollo 11. Go ahead and try it again now that you're in attitude.

193:33:42 Aldrin: Roger. Going Omni C.

[Long comm break.]
193:37:10 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. [Long pause.]

193:37:31 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Recommend antenna Bravo. Over.

[Long comm break.]
PAO:At 193 hours, 40 minutes, Apollo 11's distance from Earth is 13,044 nautical miles [24,157 km]. Velocity; 16,439 feet per second [5,011 m/s].

193:41:08 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Recommend antenna Bravo, or at least a better one. Over.

[Long comm break.]
193:47:35 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston.

193:47:39 Armstrong: Go ahead, Ron.

193:47:40 Evans: Roger. Faces are red here. We lost data with you there for a while. Did you do the P52? Over.

193:47:47 Armstrong: That's affirmative, we completed the P52. We'll give you the data from it in just a second. We passed our sextant star check at entry attitude, and right now we're maneuvering to our first horizon check pitch attitude of 298 degrees.

193:48:05 Evans: Roger. Copy that, 11.

[Very long comm break.]
PAO: Apollo Control at 193 hours, 50 minutes. Apollo 11's distance now 11,463 nautical miles [21,229 km], approaching at a velocity of 17,322 feet per second [5,280 m/s]. We're just under an hour away from scheduled Command Module-Service Module separation and about an hour and 12 minutes away from entry.

193:58:53 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. About 4 minutes to 1 hour, and I'll give you a mark at 1 hour. Was a Command Module pre-heat necessary? Over.

193:59:03 Collins: Negative that.

193:59:06 Evans: Roger. Copy. Negative Command Module pre-heat.

[Comm break.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control at 194 hours. Apollo 11's distance from Earth now 10,066 nautical miles [18,642 km]. Velocity 18,227 feet per second [5,556 m/s].
[MP3 audio file. 3,001 kB. Left channel: clean air/ground. Right channel: air/ground with PAO commentary. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
194:02:06 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston.

194:02:09 Collins: Go ahead.

194:02:11 Evans: Roger. We don't want to jettison the hydrogen tank that's stratified, so could you cycle the fans in Tank 2 please? Hydrogen Tank 2.

194:02:26 Collins: You better believe. That old Service Module's taken good care of us. We want to take good care of it.

194:02:30 Evans: It sure has, hasn't it.

194:02:33 Collins: It's been a champ.

[Comm break.]
PAO: That was Mike Collins.

PAO: Apollo 11 is 1 hour away now from entry into the Earth's atmosphere.

194:04:48 Evans: 11, Houston. I'll give you a time hack at 58 minutes to go. It's about 15 seconds yet.

194:04:57 Collins: Thank you. [Pause.]

194:05:04 Evans: Stand by.

194:05:07 Evans: Mark.

194:05:08 Evans: 58 minutes.

194:05:13 Aldrin: Roger.

[Long comm break.]

[MP3 audio file. 8,606 kB. Left channel: clean air/ground. Right channel: air/ground with PAO commentary. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

PAO: This is Apollo Control at 194 hours, 10 minutes. Apollo 11 is now 8 thousand, 5 hun...

194:10:13 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston.

194:10:16 Aldrin: Go ahead, Houston. Apollo 11.

194:10:17 Evans: Rog. We have our updated state vector out there for you. Request P00 and Accept. Over. [Pause.]

194:10:28 Aldrin: Okay. You've got it.

194:10:32 Evans: Okay. Here it comes.

[Comm break.]
PAO: Spacecraft distance is 8,393 nautical miles [15,544 km]. Velocity; 19,512 feet per second [5,947 m/s]. Rescue and ARIA aircraft are reported on station, and the Hornet's helicopters containing the swimmers are reported airborne. Swim One is helicopter number 53. Three swimmers from that helo are expected to place the collar on the spacecraft, floatation collar. Crew of Swim One consists of Lieutenant Commander Donald G. Pitchmand, pilot.
[According to a list of key Apollo 11 personnel on the website of the National Air & Space Museum, the pilot of Swim 1 was Donald Richmon.]
194:11:55 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston.

194:11:58 Aldrin: Go ahead.

194:12:00 Evans: Roger. The computer is yours now. Looks like you're in VHF range, here. So we'll try a VHF check for you. We'll just send VHF up to you. Stand by.

194:12:11 Aldrin: Okay.

194:12:25 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. VHF check on Simplex Alpha. Over.

194:12:32 Aldrin: Roger, Houston. Apollo 11, VHF Simplex Alpha, loud and clear. How me? Over.

194:12:38 Evans: Roger, 11. Houston. You're loud. The standard VHF noise, though, makes you realize that S-band is good.

194:12:48 Aldrin: Roger. Understand. Thank you. [Long pause.]

194:13:19 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Backup S-band now, and we're standing by for Command Module RCS activation.

194:13:27 Aldrin: Okay. We're just about there.

[Comm break.]
PAO: Swim One's pilot, Commander Pitchmand, is from Orlando, Florida. Co-pilot Lt. William W. Strawn of Plymouth, Michigan; Crewman James R. Johnson, Raleigh, North Carolina. The swimmers aboard Swim One are Lt JG John McLachlan of Spokane, Washington; Petty Officer 2nd Class Terry A. Muehlenbach, Chatsworth, California; and Petty Officer 3rd Class Mitchell L. Bucklew of Sanford, Florida. These 3 swimmers are scheduled to attach the flotation collar and then move away from the Command Module while helicopter number 66, designated Recovery One, moves into the area and deploys one swimmer, Lt. Clancey Hatelberg.

194:15:15 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston, you're Go for Pyro Arm.

194:15:19 Collins: Thank you, Houston.

[Comm break.]
PAO:Lt. Clancey Hatelberg of Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, will deploy from Recovery One wearing a biological isolation garment and he will hand to the crew through the hatch their biological isolation garments. At 194 hours, 16 minutes; Apollo 11 is 7,512 nautical miles [13,912 km] from Earth, velocity 20,304 feet per second [6,189 m/s].

194:16:36 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Your Command Module pressurization looks mighty fine to us.

194:16:41 Armstrong: Looks good here, Ron.

194:16:46 Evans: And 11, Houston, I've got an update for about four items on your Entry PAD.

194:16:55 Aldrin: Ready to copy.

194:16:57 Evans: Roger. Your Max-g, 06.3; your Noun 60, your Gamma at 400k, 6.48; your range to go on the EMS, 1403.3; and your Retro time for V-circular, 02:14. Over.

194:17:40 Aldrin: Roger. Copy Max g, 6.3; R2 at Noun 60, 6.48; range to go EMS, 14033; RET V-circular, 02:14. Over.

194:17:58 Evans: Roger. Readback is correct there.

[Long comm break.]
PAO: The crew of helicopter 66, Recovery One; the pilot Cdr. D. S. Jones of Madison, Wisconsin; Co-pilot Lt JG Bruce A. Johnson, Bremerton, Washington; and the two crewmen who will assist the astronauts into the Helo; Chief Petty Officer Norvel L. Wood of Carmi, Illinois and Chief Petty Officer Stanley G. Robnett of Portales, Mexico - New Mexico.
[MP3 audio file. 244 kB. Left channel: clean air/ground. Right channel: air/ground with PAO commentary. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: At 194 hours, 22 minutes; distance is 6,509 nautical miles [12,055 km]. Velocity; 21,366 feet per second [6,512 m/s].
[MP3 audio file. 5,288 kB. Left channel: clean air/ground. Right channel: air/ground with PAO commentary. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
194:24:37 Collins: Houston, Apollo 11.

194:24:39 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Go.

194:24:43 Collins: Roger. The first horizon check 194:23:06 at a pitch angle of 298 does not quite fall on the 31 7 line. It's just a little high. It's within 5 degrees tolerance.

194:24:57 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. The horizon check there was supposed to be at 33. Over.

[Collins has carried out the horizon check ten minutes early. It should have been 194:33:06.]
194:25:05 Collins: Okay. That's fine, sir. Thank you.

194:25:07 Evans: Roger.

[Long comm break.]

[The crew will make re-entry without suits or helmets on. Although this was a controversial decision on the first Apollo flight, Apollo 7, when the crew wore suits but no helmets contrary to MCC's advice, by now it is regarded as routine.]

PAO: Helo number 64 is designated Swim Two. If that helicopter is closer than Swim One to the landing point, swimmers will be deployed from Swim Two to attach the collar. Those swimmers are Lt J.G. Wesley T. Chesser of Arlington, Virginia; 3rd Class Petty Officer Michael G. Mallary of Alderwood Manor, Washington, and Seaman John M. Wolfram of Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin. The Helo's crew consists of pilot, Lt. Richard J. Barrett of Squannanoa [Swannanoa], North Carolina; copilot, Lt. George R. Conn, Imperial Beach, California, Petty Officer 2nd Class Curtis E. Hill, Black Rock, Arkansas, and Petty Officer 2nd Class Richard B. Seaton, Hibbing, Minnesota.

PAO: Apollo 11's distance now 5,411 nautical miles [10,021 km]. Velocity; 22,642 feet per second [6,901 m/s].

194:29:00 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Command Module RCS looks fine to us.

194:29:05 Collins: Same here, Ron. Looks very good. Doesn't make as much noise as we thought. Some of them are barely audible.

194:29:11 Evans: Roger.

194:29:16 Evans: And 11, Houston. The weather's still holding real fine in the recovery area.

194:29:22 Evans: Looks like it's about 1500 scattered, high scattered. And it's still 3- to 6-foot waves.

194:29:29 Collins: The air part of it sounds good.

194:29:33 Evans: Roger. [Long pause.]

194:30:00 Evans: 11, Houston, I'll give you another Mark at 33 minutes. Stand by.

194:30:07 Evans: Mark.

194:30:10 Collins: Roger that.

[Comm break.]

[MP3 audio file. 5,352 kB. Left channel: clean air/ground. Right channel: air/ground with PAO commentary. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

194:32:37 Aldrin: Houston, Apollo 11. Do you have any recommended settings to catch the sunset? Over.

194:32:48 Evans: Roger. Well, the time is 36:41. And stand by for some settings.

194:32:59 Aldrin: Okay. I'll probably only be doing it maybe - part of it at six frames a second, some of it at one. So I can be changing settings as it goes through.

194:33:09 Evans: Roger. Copy. [Pause.]

194:33:19 Collins: And the horizon check passes. It's right on the money.

194:33:24 Evans: Hey, mighty fine. Sounds good.

[Comm break.]
194:35:07 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. On the shooting at the Sun, f:16th at 1 over 250.
[Meaning manually set camera at f:16 aperture and 1/250th of a second shutter speed.]
194:35:18 Aldrin: Understand f:16 at 1 over 250.

194:35:22 Evans: Roger.

[Comm break.]
194:37:05 Collins: And the Sun is going down on schedule. It's getting real dark in here.

194:37:11 Evans: Apollo 11. Houston. Copy.

[Very long comm break.]
PAO: Distance; 3,896 nautical miles [7,215 km]. Velocity; 24,915 feet per second [7,594 m/s].

PAO: And we're about 10 minutes away from the scheduled separation time now.

[MP3 audio file. 334 kB. Left channel: clean air/ground. Right channel: air/ground with PAO commentary. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: Apollo 11's distance now is 3,000 nautical miles [5,556 km]. Velocity; 26,685 feet per second [8,134 m/s]. In the next 20 minutes, Apollo 11 will add almost 10,000 feet per second [3,000 m/s] to that figure.
[MP3 audio file. 342 kB. Left channel: clean air/ground. Right channel: air/ground with PAO commentary. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: Technical difficulties have interrupted the radio-TV news pool feed from the carrier USS Hornet, and also the newswriters' copy feed from that ship.
[MP3 audio file. 6,012 kB. Left channel: clean air/ground. Right channel: air/ground with PAO commentary. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: Guidance Officer reports the Command Module computer looks good and the guidance and navigation system is Go aboard the spacecraft.

194:48:54 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. We see you getting ready for Sep. Everything looks mighty fine down here.

194:48:59 Collins: Same here, Ron. Thank you.

[Comm break.]
PAO: We're awaiting confirmation of separation. We confirm separation now from on-the-ground readings from telemetry. We can confirm separation.

194:50:42 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. You're still looking mighty fine here. You're cleared for landing.

194:50:47 Collins: We appreciate that, Ron. Thank you.

194:50:49 Aldrin: Roger. Gear's down and locked.

194:50:52 Evans: Roger.

[Long comm break.]

[This quip about aircraft landing gear was made earlier by Apollo 7 Commander Wally Schirra as the glow of re-entry surrounded his Command Module.]

PAO: Altitude; 1,288 nautical miles [2,385 km]. Velocity; 31,232 feet per second [9,520 m/s].

PAO: Flight Director Milt Windler has just informed recovery: Quote, "We're on the final for the carrier."

[MP3 audio file. 8,298 kB. Left channel: clean air/ground. Right channel: air/ground with PAO commentary. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
194:54:40 Aldrin: Houston, we got the Service Module going by. A little high and a little bit to the right.

194:54:49 Evans: Roger. Thank you.

194:54:53 Collins: And it's rotating just like it should be. Thrusters are firing.

194:55:00 Evans: Good. It's got a lot of gas there to burn out, too.

194:55:07 Aldrin: It's coming across now from right to left.

194:55:13 Evans: Houston. Roger.

[Comm break.]
PAO: 800 nautical miles [1,500 km] high. Velocity; 33,000 feet per second [10,000 m/s].

PAO: Guidance reports Apollo 11 right down the middle of the corridor. 7 minutes away from entry.

194:57:07 Aldrin: Houston, Apollo 11. You going to turn on the tape recorder shortly?

194:57:19 Evans: 11, Houston. You can go ahead and turn it on.

194:57:24 Aldrin: Okay. I'll have to go to Command Reset to do that.

194:57:34 Evans: 11, Houston. That's negative. All you have to do is turn it on. That'll be fine.

194:57:44 Aldrin: I guess I don't know how to turn it on, then. I got PCM/Analog, Record, Forward, High bit rate and barber pole.

194:58:03 Evans: 11, Houston. We'll send the On command from down here, see if it works.

194:58:07 Aldrin: Okay. [Long pause.]

PAO: Velocity; 34,630 feet per second [10,555 m/s].

194:58:56 Aldrin: Got our friend the Moon whipping by the field of view right now.

194:59:01 Evans: Roger. Copy.

[Comm break.]
PAO: Velocity coming up on 35,000 feet per second [10,700 m/s] now.

PAO: 3 minutes to entry.

PAO: Apollo 11 in the proper attitude and...

195:00:32 Evans: 11, Houston. We'll have you for about 3 or 4 minutes through Redstone and then pick you up after blackout through ARIA.

195:00:41 Aldrin: Roger.

[Comm break.]
PAO: Apollo 11 lined up right down the middle of the entry corridor. Velocity's now 35,578 feet per second [10,844 km].

PAO: We're a minute and 45 seconds from entry. Blackout will begin 18 seconds after entry.

195:01:48 Aldrin: Houston, Apollo 11. I'm going to go to Command Reset and turn the tape on.

195:02:00 Evans: 11, Houston. Recommend negative on that. That'll put us in low bit rate. [Pause.]

195:02:12 Aldrin: Okay. I already put it to Command Reset, but I still have barber pole on the tape. And now my switch is high bit rate.

195:02:22 Evans: Okay. That'll be fine. On 225, there, if you can reach it, Buzz, the last two circuit breakers in the second row from the bottom. Punch those in. [Pause.]

PAO: 36,000 feet per second [10,970 m/s].

195:02:42 Evans: And 11, Houston, don't mess around with that 225 there.

195:02:48 Aldrin: Okay. [Long pause.]

195:03:01 Evans: And 11, Houston. You're going over the hill there shortly. You're looking mighty fine to us.

195:03:06 Armstrong: See you later.

[Long comm break.]

[Nine minutes of radio silence from Apollo 11 now follow, as the spacecraft is surrounded by ionised gases created by the heat of re-entry. Mission Control starts calling them after 4 minutes.]

PAO: We're at entry time. Blackout very shortly. Range to go to splash 1,533 nautical miles [2,839 km]. There's blackout.
[MP3 audio file. 10.1 MB. Left channel: clean air/ground. Right channel: air/ground with PAO commentary. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This blackout period should last for about 3 minutes, 45 seconds. At blackout we were showing velocity; 36,237 feet per second [11,045 m/s]. Range to go to splash; 1,510 nautical miles [2,797 km].

PAO: The elapsed time for end of blackout; 195 hours, 7 minutes even.

PAO: Drogue chute deployment time is 195 hours, 12 minutes, 8 seconds.

PAO: And the Control Center will not attempt to communicate with Apollo 11 after drogue deploy time. It'll leave the airwaves clear for the recovery forces. PAO: ARIA 3 reported a visual contact.

PAO: We're at 3 minutes, 20 seconds since entry. Blackout should end about 3 minutes, 53 seconds after entry.

PAO: We're about 11 minutes away from landing.

PAO: ARIA 3 would - is the up-range ARIA aircraft.

195:07:15 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston through ARIA. [No answer.]

195:07:37 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston through ARIA. [No answer.]

195:08:10 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston through ARIA 4. [No answer.]

PAO: The Hornet reports Air Boss 1 has visual contact.

195:09:08 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston through ARIA. Standing by. Over. [No answer.]

195:09:45 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston in the blind. Air Boss has the visual contact. [No answer.]

PAO: The Hornet now reports a visual contact. Visual contact from the recovery ship.

PAO: Hornet reports momentary visual contact has now disappeared behind clouds.

PAO: We're 7 minutes, 44 seconds from entry [that is, after entry]. Drogue chute deployment scheduled for an elapsed time from entry of 9 minutes, 1 second.

195:11:18 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Standing by for your DSKY reading. Over. [No answer.]

PAO: Hawaii Rescue 2 reports an S-band contact with the spacecraft.

195:11:49 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Stand by for your miss distance. Over. [No answer.]

195:12:04 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Standing by for your DSKY reading. Over. [No answer.]

195:12:09 Evans: Drogues. [Long pause.]

195:12:22 Evans: Apollo 11, Houston. Your DSKY reading, please. Over.

195:12:31 Armstrong: Roger. We were aiming right on 13, 32 and 169, 17. [Long pause.]

PAO: Apollo 11 reports right on. We take that to mean that the drogues deployed on time.

195:12:53 Armstrong: Reading 13, 30; 169, 15.

[Comm break.]
PAO: Apollo 11 should be on main chutes now.

PAO: Hornet reports a sonic boom a short time ago.

PAO: We're just under 4 minutes to landing.

PAO: We will continue to monitor for any conversation between the spacecraft and recovery forces, but we will not initiate a call from now on to the spacecraft from the Control Center.

[MP3 audio file. 67.2 MB. Left channel: clean air/ground. Right channel: air/ground with PAO commentary. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
195:15:03 Hornet: Apollo 11, Apollo 11. This is Hornet. Hornet. Over.

195:15:07 Armstrong: Hello, Hornet. This is Apollo 11 reading you loud and clear. Our position 13, 30; 169, 15.

195:15:19 Hornet: 11, Hornet. Copy 13, 30; 167, 5. Any further data? Over.

195:15:24 Armstrong: 13, 30; 169, 15.

PAO:Hornet has voice contact. Aircraft reports visual with 3 full chutes.

195:15:31 Hornet: Do you have an error?

195:15:39 Hornet: We have that. And what is condition of the crew?

195:15:45 Hornet: 11, this is Hornet. What's your error of splashdown and condition of crew? Over.

195:15:52 Armstrong: The condition of crew [garble]. 4,000 - 3,500 feet, on the way down.

195:16:00 Hornet: 11, this is Hornet. Copy. 11, Hornet. What's your splashdown error? Over.

195:16:06 Armstrong: Okay. Our splashdown error is by latitude, longitude, 13, 30; 169, 15. That's [garble].

195:16:19 Hornet: Hornet. Roger, out. [Long pause.]

PAO: Hornet reports spacecraft right on target point.

195:16:44 Armstrong: Okay, Hornet. Apollo 11 is out.

195:16:48 Hornet: Roger. 2,500 on chutes. [Pause.]

195:17:00 Swim 1: Swim 1 has [garble] contact, bearing 150, holding [garble] 190.

195:17:13 Hornet: Hornet. Roger. Out.

195:17:19 Swim 1: [Garble] bearing 200.

195:17:24 Armstrong: Apollo 11 at 1,500 feet.

195:17:27 Hornet: Hornet. Roger. Copy. Out.

PAO: That's Neil Armstrong giving the position report.

195:17:32 Swim 1: Swim 1 has a visual. Dead ahead about a mile and a half? [Garble].

195:17:42 Hornet: Hornet. Roger.

195:17:44 Swim 1: [Garble] spacecraft.

195:17:48 Swim 1: Roger. This is Swim One, Apollo 11.

195:17:54 Armstrong: [Garble] 300 feet.

195:17:56 Swim 1: Roger. You're looking real good. [Long pause.]

195:18:18 Swim 1: Splashdown! Apollo has splashdown.

Hornet: Hornet, copy. Understand splashdown.

Spacecraft: [Garble] splashdown. [Long pause.]

[In the movie "In the Shadow of the Moon" (2006), Mike Collins recalled: "I can remember the beautiful water. We were out in the deep ocean in the Pacific. It was such a startling violet color. I remember looking at the ocean and admiring: 'nice ocean you've got here planet Earth'."]
Unidentified speaker: [Garble]. Swim 1: This is Swim 1. The Command Module is at stable 2, stable 2. Over.

Hornet: Hornet, roger.

Airboss: Okay, Hornet. This is Air Boss. Presently orbiting the [garble] at 1,000 feet. [Garble].

Hornet: Roger.

PAO: Stable 2 is upside down. The flotation bags will right the spacecraft.

Swim 1: This is Swim 1 in a hover beside the Command Module. The Command Module [garble] is in stable 2. The dye marker is deployed and [garble]. The chutes appear to be detached and are downwind of the Command Module.

Hornet: Hornet, roger.

Unidentified Speaker: [Garble].

Airboss: Roger, thank you. 235, 13 235 [garble].

Swim 1: This is Swim 1. The Command Module is still in Stable 2. The - the dye marker is beginning to trail out [garble] with the wind. The main chutes are detached and streaming downwind.

Hornet: Hornet, copy. [Long pause.]

PAO: It normally takes 8 to 10 minutes for the flotation bags to right the spacecraft. Swim 1 is getting ready to deploy swimmers.

Air Boss: This is Air Boss, Recovery 1 and Photo 1, go to high frequency [garble].

Recovery: Roger, Recovery 1.

Recovery: Photo 1, Photo 1. Could you [garble]. Over.

Swim 1: This is Swim 1 [garble].

Recovery: Photo 1.

Recovery: Hornet, copy. [Long pause.]

Recovery: Photo, are you going to pick up commentary?

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. Roger.

Hornet: (garbled) Air Boss 1, this is Hornet bridge. Request commentary if available, over.

Air Boss: Visible trailing [garble]. The wind is 060, 15 knots. [Garble] 30 degrees to the vertical toward the downwind side.

Air Boss: Recovery 1, the drogue chutes shall be clear of all aircraft.

Recovery: It's a few miles to the north.

Air Boss: This is Air Boss. We currently have 3 helos on the scene. The drogue chutes splashed down approximately 1,500 yards on a bearing of 240 from the Command Module.

Air Boss: And Hornet, this is Air Boss. Are you copying the commentary?

Recovery: This is Hornet, copy affirmative.

Photo 1: This is Photo One. The 3 (garbled) is (garbled) plus 20 feet and two flotation bags are visible at this time. The (garbled) to go to 4. (garbled) Module (garbled) above the other (garbled) of the vertical axis (garbled).

Hornet: Hornet, I didn't copy Photo 1's full report. Understand 2 flotation bags deployed and in stable 1 now. Is that correct? Over.

Photo 1: [Garble] it is upright, but it isn't [garble] stable 2.

Air Boss: Understand still stable 2.

Photo 1: [Garble].

PAO: Apollo 11 reported still in stable 2, but gradually righting itself.

Recovery: Air Boss comment. I am not copying Photo 1. Would you relay. Over.

Air Boss: This is Air Boss 1. Photo 1 says that it is still in stable 2. The bags are inflated. It is not absolutely inverted now, it's 70 degrees to the vertical axis. Still stable 2.

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. The module is now 90 degrees to the vertical axis.

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. The Command Module is stable 1, flotation bags are inflated.

PAO:Apollo 11 is stable 1 now, stable 1.

Photo 1: [Garble].

Hornet: Air Boss 1, this is Hornet Bridge. Say when it is stable 1. Over.

Air Boss: [Garble] stability above the vertical axis is approximately 30 degrees.

Hornet: Hornet,. Roger.

Hornet: Air Boss, Hornet. Recovery 1 is ready to deploy swimmers in 1 minute, Swim Two, Swim Two. [garble].

Hornet: [Garble].

Hornet: Hornet, roger.

Recovery: [Garble] behind it has rolled [garble] has rolled forward.

PAO: Swimmers to deploy in about 1 minute.

Swim 2: Swim 2 is in position. [Garble] we are going to lower the first swimmer.

Air Boss: Roger, Swim 2 start recovery at once. You are cleared.

Recovery: Okay, commencing.

Swim 2: Swim 2 is commencing to put the first swimmer in the water.

Photo 1: The hatch of the capsule is now to the up-wind to the first swimmer. This is Photo 1. There are no dye markers in the water. The first swimmer.

Hornet: This is the Hornet. Did...

Photo 1: Swim 2 dropped his first swimmer.

Air Boss: Yes, affirmative. This is Air Boss. The swimmer is in the water.

Photo 1: The swimmer is in the water and he is connecting [garble] deployed.

Hornet: Hornet, the sea anchor has been attached and is deployed.

Hornet: This is Hornet. Roger. I copy. Swim 1 now.

Swim 2: The sea anchor is deployed [garble].

Air Boss: Roger, copy.

PAO: The sea anchor has been deployed by the swimmer.

Spacecraft: Copy 1. Apollo 11.

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. The first swimmer has given a thumbs up. Swim 2 is standing [garble] for 2 swimmers and the floatation collar.

Air Boss: Apollo 11, Air Boss. Condition of the crew?

Spacecraft: Air Boss, Apollo 11. Everyone inside, our checklist is complete, awaiting swimmers.

Air Boss: Thank you, Apollo 11.

Swim 2: [Garble] for 2 swimmers and the flotation collar secured to the Command Module.

Hornet: Air Boss, Hornet. What's the condition?

Swim 2: The crew is excellent. Both checklists have been completed. They are ready to take on the swimmers.

Swim 2: [Garble] the water.

PAO: 3 swimmers in the water from Swim 2, Swim 2 Helo.

Swim 2: [Garble].

Air Boss: Apollo 11, this is Air Boss. Are you copying the narration or following the sequence of recovery operations?

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. The [garble].

Armstrong: [Garble] just before that last call. We've just been picking up your Comm now.

Swim 2: [Garble] flotation collar half-way around the Command Module.

PAO:The crew has reported to Air Boss that they are in excellent condition. Flotation collar is about half way around the spacecraft now.

Swim 2: The Command Module [garble] quite well [garble] vertical axis of [garble] downwind [garble] 10 degrees. [Garble] the flotation collar [garble] to Photo 1. The uprighting bags. 2 are fully inflated, 1 is partially inflated.

Air boss: Air Boss. Are you copying?

Photo 1: Affirmative, roger.

Photo 1: The flotation collar has been attached [garble] flotation.

PAO: The flotation collar is attached now.

PAO: And the collar is inflated.

Photo 1: Photo 1, the swimmers are - the lift has approached.

PAO: Air boss reporting the spacecraft riding very smoothly.

Hornet: Swan, this is Hornet. Bridge, request the tacan on top. Over.

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. The raft is in the water - 241-degree radial - nine miles.

Air boss: Stand - Stand by, Hornet.

Photo 1: The raft is inflated.

Photo 1: [Garble] Command Module.

Photo 1: Photo 1, I repeat very - from Hornet, 241-degree radial, 9 miles. Over.

Hornet: Hornet. Roger.

Photo 1: Photo 1, [Garble].

Air boss: Hornet. This is Air boss 1.

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. The [garble] has commenced his approach to drop the second raft upwind.

Air Boss: Apollo 11 this is Air Boss 1. We have the Command Module on radar bearing of 244, [garble] 12 miles.

Photo 1: Second raft is in the water. Seventy five feet upwind [garble] Raft number 2 is inflated [garble] and number 2 is being [garble].

Photo 1: Recovery 1 has moved into position. Standing by to deploy the swimmer.

Hornet: Roger.

PAO: Recovery 1 getting ready to deploy the swimmer with the biological isolation garments. The other swimmers...

Photo 1: This is Photo 1, the weather in the area [garble] 2,000 feet [garble] appear to be [garble] One swimmer is in raft number 1. One swimmer in raft number 2 [garble] deploy the sea anchor.

Unidentified speaker: [Garble] copy [garble] in position.

Photo 1: Recovery [garble] is making his approach to drop the...

Unidentified speaker: Alright, copy.

Unidentified speaker: [Garble].

Photo 1: The swimmer is in the water. [Garble].

Hornet: Hornet. Roger.

Photo 1: Swimmer is in the raft number 2. Recovery 1 is in position, standing by to lower the bag of BIGs.

Hornet: Hornet. Roger.

PAO: The swimmer with the Biological Isolation Garments is in the raft next to the spacecraft. That's Lt. Clancy Hatleberg of Chippawaw Falls, Wisconsin. He's also wearing a Biological Isolation Garment.

Photo 1: Recovery 1 is in position, lowering the bag of BIGs at this time.

Hornet: Roger.

PAO: And the helo is lowering the astronauts' BIGs, or Biological Isolation Garments, to Lt. Hatleberg.

Photo 1: The bag of BIGs is...

Hornet: Hornet. Roger.

PAO: And the report is that the bag of BIGs is in raft number 2.

Photo 1: The swimmers are unloading the net at this time.

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. The bag of BIGs and decontaminant are in raft number 2 - module is very stable, very stable. There's only [garble] about the vertical axis, a [garble].

Hornet: Roger.

Hornet: Air Boss, Hornet. What's the present condition of the astronauts?

Air Boss: Hornet, [garble].

Hornet: Affirmative. Determine the present condition of the astronauts?

Air Boss: Hello. This is Air Boss 1 - [what is] your condition?

Collins: Our condition is all three excellent. We're just fine. Take your time.

Air Boss: All right. Okay.

PAO:That was Mike Collins reporting the crew was excellent.

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. The - One swimmer is [garble] trying to don [garble] one swimmer in raft No. 1. Full scuba.

Hornet: All right, we copy. BIG swimmer preparing to don BIG suit. One swimmer in raft 1 with full scuba. What are the other swimmers doing?.

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. The other two swimmers are [garble]. Over.

PAO: Lt. Hatleberg putting on his Biological Isolation Garment.

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. The visibility [garble] 15 miles.

Air Boss: Roger.

Air Boss: Photo 1, this is Air Boss. [Garble] sea state [garble].

Spacecraft: This is Photo 1. The winds are from 065 or 060, 15 to 20 knots - 4 to 6 feet. Over.

Air Boss: Roger.

Swimmer 1: This is Photo 1. The BIG swimmer is making adjustments to his garment. He has his helmet on - raised to his shoulders. He's trying to zip it up at this time.

Hornet: Hornet. Roger.

PAO: The ship reports it is now 7 miles from the spacecraft.

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. The BIG swimmer is [garble] helmet at this time.

Air Boss: Copy.

Recovery: Photo [garble]. What is the position of the sea dye marker?

Swimmer 1: This is Swimmer 1, reported earlier there was no dye marker [garble] five minutes [garble].

Recovery: [Garble].

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. The [garble] has his mask [garble].

Recovery: [Garble].

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. The [garble] has [garble] his helmet. [Garble] holding the Command Module.

Air Boss: Recovery 1, this is Air Boss [garble] report [garble].

Collins: This is Apollo 11. Tell everybody take your sweet time. We're doing just fine in here. It's not as stable as the Hornet, but almost.

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. Apollo 11 reports everything is fine. Not as stable as the Hornet but almost. Over.

Recovery: Hornet, Roger.

Photo 1: This is Photo 1, Raft number 2 is within 10 feet of the Command Module at this time.

Air Boss: Roger.

Photo 1: Photo 1, my big trouble is trying to transport to raft number 2 to [garble] transfer the [garble].

PAO: Unofficial splash time is 195 hours, 18 minutes, 21 seconds.

Photo 1: [Garble] swimmer is [garble] number 1 at this time. We recovered [garble] Command Module [garble].

Photo 1: The three swimmers [garble].

PAO: Hornet reports the other swimmers are now up-wind of the Command Module leaving Lt. Hatleberg in his BIG and with the decontaminant that will be placed around the hatch and on the...

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. The BIG swimmer is securing [garble].

Swimmer 1: This is Photo 1. The BIG swimmer has transferred [garble] the BIGs [garble].

PAO: Lt. Hatleberg is now transferring the BIGs to the crew.

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. The [garble] the hatch [garble].

PAO: The Hornet now estimates they are 4 and three-quarters miles away from the spacecraft.

Photo 1: The hatch is closed.

PAO: The BIGs are in the Command Module and the hatch has been closed again.

Swimmer 1: [Garble] This is Swimmer [garble]. Radio check. Over.

Recovery: Loud and clear. Loud and clear.

Swimmer 1: Swim [garble]. Read you the same. Over.

Recovery: Roger. Out.

PAO: Lt. Hatleberg is called the BIG swimmer.

Swimmer 1: This is Swimmer 1. The BIG swimmer is [garble] procedures [garble] Command Module.

PAO: The BIG swimmer is now spraying the hatch area and the top deck and around the hatch on the Command Module with the decontaminant.

Hornet: Apollo 11, this is Hornet. We're 4 miles out, making our approach.

Unidentified Speaker: [Garble] at this time [garble].

PAO: The Hornet advises the crew they're 4 miles away.

Swimmer 1: This is Swimmer 1. The BIG swimmer has attached the flotation collar and is now in raft number 1.

Swimmer 1: This is Swimmer No. 1. The BIG swimmer is still in raft number 1.

Hornet: Swimmer 1, Hornet. Understand BIG swimmer has completed his decontamination of the Command Module, is that correct?

Swimmer 1: This is Swimmer 1. The [garble] on the flotation collar.

Hornet: Roger.

Photo 1: Photo 1, Hornet, I passed - from Pacific Chief, you are cutting out. You may be releasing your teeth too early on transmissions. Over.

Swimmer 1: This is Swimmer 1. Roger. Out.

PAO: The Hornet reports it was 13 miles from the aim point at splash. The carrier was 13 miles from the aim point at splash.

Swimmer 1: This is Swimmer 1. Earlier [garble] that he had made preparations to commence...

Recovery: Roger.

Swimmer 1: This is Swimmer 1, the BIG swimmer [garble].

PAO: The BIG swimmer has reported communicating with the astronauts by visual hand signals through the hatch window.

Swimmer: Photo 1, the crew [garble].

Swimmer: Photo 1. The astronauts have opened the hatch. The first astronaut - got out of the hatch. The first - astronaut, right.

Swimmer: Photo 1, the...

PAO: The first astronaut is now emerging.

Swimmer: [Garble] up wind.

Swimmer: This is [garble]. There is a Photo 1 the position very shortly. Position - report on the first astronaut is up.

Hornet: Roger.

Swimmer: Photo 1.

PAO: Astronaut number 2 coming up the hatch now.

Swimmer: The second one. That is [garble]. The third astronaut is out of the hatch.

PAO: And the third crewmen is out of the spacecraft now.

Swimmer: [Garble].

PAO: Hatch is closed and secured.

Swimmer: Every crewman out. All the astronauts are out.

Hornet: Roger.

PAO: Hornet now reports that the swimmer is having some difficulty securing the hatch and one of the astronauts is helping him.

Swimmer: [Garble] locked [garble] are in. [Garble]. Report of hatch secure. All three astronauts are out. [Garble].

PAO: Hatch is now reported secure.

Swimmer: This is Photo 1 [garble].

PAO: Hornet now 1 and one-quarter miles from the spacecraft.

Swimmer: [Garble].

Swimmer: (Garble] Photo 1 [garble] decontaminant on the upper portion of the Command Module.

Hornet: Hornet. Roger.

Swimmer: [Garble].

PAO: And the Lt. Hatleberg spraying decontaminant around the hatch.

Swimmer: [Garble] Photo 1, I have decontaminated [garble] spraying on the forward portion of the Command Module. [Garble].

Hornet: Hornet, Roger.

Swimmer: I am now scrubbing [garble].

Hornet: Roger.

PAO: And the swimmer now scrubbing down the Command Module with the decontaminant.

Swimmer: Photo 1 (garbled). I have completed scrubbing the Command Module. [Garble] Photo 1 [garble] the first ast [garble].

PAO: The swimmer has now started scrubbing the astronauts' biological isolations garments with the decontaminate.

Swimmer: (garbled) Photo 1 is [garble] complete. And now I'm scrubbing the shoulders of the first astronaut.

PAO: Hornet estimates distance three-quarters of a mile now.

Swimmer: Photo 1, swimmer is scrubbing the arms and shoulders of the first astronaut.

Hornet: Hornet, Roger.

Swim 1: The first astronaut is now having his BIG put on him.

Hornet: Hornet, Roger.

Swim 1: The swimmer has completed decontaminating the first astronaut.

Hornet: Hornet, over.

Swim 1: Coming to the BIG for the second astronaut.

PAO: And the first astronaut has been scrubbed down and the swimmer has started the decontamination processes on the BIG of the second astronaut.

Swim 1: [Garble].

Hornet: Roger.

Swim 1: The swimmer has scrubbed the front side of the second astronaut. He is now in the BIG.

Hornet: Roger.

Swim 1: Swim 1. The swimmer has completed the [garble].

Hornet: Roger.

PAO: Scrub down on the second astronaut completed.

Hornet: Hornet, roger.

Swim 1: This is Swim 1. The swimmer is scrubbing the back of the third astronaut [garble].

Hornet: Hornet, Roger.

Swim 1: Swim 1. The swimmer is scrubbing the arm, shoulder and the head of the astronaut [garble].

Hornet: Hornet. Hard to see, isn't it?

Hornet: Swim 1. Hornet. You cut out. Say again.

Air Boss: Hornet, this is Air Boss. He says stand by for a call from the recovery station.

Hornet: Roger.

Swim 1: This is Swim 1. The third astronaut has been scrubbed. The first and second [garble].

Hornet: Hornet, roger.

PAO: And the third astronaut has been scrubbed down, and now the astronauts are scrubbing down the swimmer.

Swim 1: The Swimmer 1 is ready and standing by for completion of the decontamination procedure.

Hornet: Hornet, roger.

Photo 1: This is Photo One. The [garble]. Both in [garble] situation [garble].

Hornet: Roger.

Swim 1: Swim One has the astronaut 1 and 2 are still in the [garble].

Hornet: Hornet, Roger.

Swim 1: Swim One, the...

Hornet: Hornet, roger.

Swim 1: This is Swim 1. Decontamination of the BIG swimmer is complete. The BIG swimmer is now decontaminating [garble] number 1.

Hornet: Hornet, Roger.

Swim 1: The BIG swimmer has given the signal to the swimming team [garble] prepare to close the Command Module.

Hornet: Roger.

PAO: The other swimmers will now proceed to the Command Module. It has been decontaminated, and the swimmers will remain on their scuba air.

Hornet: Photo 1, Hornet. Request you reconfirm that they are decontaminating raft number 1.

Hornet: All right. Photo 1, that is affirmative. Decontaminating raft number 1. The others [garble].

Hornet: This is Hornet. Roger, out.

Photo 1: This is Photo 1, raft number 2 is now closing the Command Module. All 3 swimmers are on full scuba.

Hornet: Photo, Roger.

Recovery 1: Recovery 1 is in position. Standing by.

Hornet: Recovery, Rog.

Recovery 1: The raft number 2 is at the Command Module. The swimmers are taking their positions.

Hornet: Roger.

Recovery 1: Recovery 1 is commencing his approach.

Hornet: Hornet, copy.

Recovery 1: Raft 1 is riding very smooth.

Hornet: Hornet, Roger.

Recovery 1: Recovery 1. The astronauts are in a cheerful mood. They are waving at the photographers. [Garble].

Hornet: Photo 1, Hornet. Understand recovery is making approach to pick up the first astronaut?

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. He's in position ready to commence recovery. Over.

Hornet: Hornet, Roger.

Photo 1: Hornet, this is Photo 1. Recovery 1 is commencing his first approach.

Hornet: Hornet, Roger.

PAO: And Recovery 1 going in now to pick up the first astronaut.

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. The net is being lowered.

Hornet: Roger.

Photo 1: This is Photo 1. The net is at the raft. The first astronaut is climbing into the net, and the first astronaut is in the net on the way up, clear of the Command Module. The first astronaut is half way up. The first astronaut is at the hatch.

Hornet: Roger.

Photo 1: The first astronaut is in the helicopter, the net is on its way down.

Hornet: Hornet, Roger.

Photo 1: Recovery 1 is commencing his second approach. The net is at the raft, the second astronaut is in the net, and the net is on its way up, clear of the Command Module.

Hornet: Hornet, Roger.

Photo 1: The net is at the hatch.

Hornet: Hornet, Roger.

Photo 1: The second astronaut is in the helicopter.

Hornet: Hornet, Roger.

Photo 1: The net is on its way down, Recovery 1 is making a third approach.

Hornet: Roger.

Photo 1: The net is at the raft, in, the third astronaut is climbing in the net, the third astronaut is in the net and on his way up, clear of the Command Module. The third astronaut is half way up.

Hornet: Hornet, Roger.

Photo 1: The third astronaut is in the hatch, he is climbing in the helicopter.

Hornet: Hornet, Roger.

Photo 1: All three astronauts are aboard.

Hornet: [Garble], Photo 1.

Photo 1: Roger, this is Photo 1. We have hatch on the Recovery 1 is closed.

Recovery 1: This is Recovery 1. I have three astronauts aboard. Switching power frequency, power frequency.

Swim 2: Swim 2 is in position.

Hornet: Roger. [Garble].

Swim 2: This is Swim 2 alongside the Command Module. The BIG swimmer's decontaminating the module at this time. Three swimmers are in the raft. [Garble].

PAO: Mission Director George Hage has just thanked the flight controllers assembled here in the Control Center on behalf of himself and General Phillips for the way in which they conducted this mission.

Air Boss: Stand by Swim 1 and 3. This is Air Boss. I haven't seen any more of the 2 drogue chutes nor the apex chute.

PAO: No cigars being lit up here yet. We're waiting until the crew is on the carrier. A few are being wetted in anticipation of a match, but we don't see any lit yet.

Swim 2: This is Swim 2. [Garble].

Hornet: Hornet, Roger.

PAO: The elevator will take Recovery 1 down to the hangar deck and where the crew will enter the Mobile Quarantine Facility. And the flags are waving and the cigars are being lit up. And clear across the big board in front is President John F. Kennedy's message to Congress of May, 1961: I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to Earth. That has been accomplished.

Swim 2: This is Swim 2. [Garble] the Command Module very well. It's extremely stable.

PAO: The Apollo 11 plaque has been hung in the Mission Control Center - a replica of the crew patch.

[MP3 audio file. 359 kB. Left channel: clean air/ground. Right channel: air/ground with PAO commentary. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This Control Center becoming jammed with people as - people from the staff support rooms coming in here. We've never seen this many people in the Control Center at one time before.

Speaker: President Nixon waving to the astronauts. The curtains have been drawn. There they are in the rear window. President is receiving applause from the crowd. Astronauts gather in the window.

[Television pictures show President Richard M. Nixon approaching the Mobile Quarantine Facility on the hangar deck of the USS Hornet, where he has been waiting to greet the astronauts. The crew, now without their Biological Isolation Garments and masks, appear at the window of the cabin, as a curtain is opened. They speak with the President by microphone.]
Nixon: Nell, Buzz, and Mike. I want you to know that I think I'm luckiest man in the world. And I say this not only because I have the honor to be President of the United States, but particularly because I have the privilege of speaking for so many in welcoming you back to Earth. I could tell you about all the messages we received in Washington. Over one hundred foreign governments, Emperors, and Presidents and Prime Ministers and Kings have sent the most warm messages that we have ever received. They represent over 2 billion people on this Earth. All of them who have had the opportunity through television to see what you have done. And then I also bring you messages from members of the Cabinet and members of the Senate and members of the House and Space Agency. And in the streets of San Francisco where people stopped me a few days ago, and you all love that city, I know, as I do. But most important, I had a telephone call yesterday. The toll wasn't, incidentally, as great as the one I made to you fellows on the Moon. (Laughter) I made that collect, just in case you didn't know. But I called the three of, in my view, three of the greatest ladies and most courageous ladies in the whole world today, your wives. And from Jan and Joan and Pat, I bring their love and their congratulations. We think that it is just wonderful that they could have participated, at least through television, in this return; we're only sorry they couldn't be here. And also, I've got to let you in on a little secret - I made a date with them. (Laughter) I invited them to dinner on the 13th of August, right after you come out of quarantine. It will be a state dinner held in Los Angeles. The governors of all the fifty States will be there, the ambassadors, others from around the world and in America. And they told me that you would come too. And all I want to know - will you come? We want to honor you then.

Armstrong: We'll do anything you say, Mr. President. Just anything.

Nixon: One question, I think, all of us would like to ask. As we saw you bouncing around in that boat out there, I wonder if that wasn't the hardest part of the journey. Was that - did any of you get seasick?

Armstrong: No, we didn't. And it was one of the harder parts, but it was one of the most pleasant, we can assure you.

Nixon: Yes, well, I just know that you can sense what we all sense. When you get back now - incidentally, have you been able to follow some of the things that happened when you've gone. Did you know about the All-Star game?

Armstrong: Yes, sir. The Capsule Communicators have been giving us daily news stories.

Collins: They daily post us.

Nixon: Were you American League or National League?

Armstrong: I'm [a?] National League man.

Aldrin: I'm non-partisan, sir.

Collins: That's right.

Nixon: There's the politician in the group, right.

Armstrong: We're sorry you missed that game.

Nixon: Yes, well - you knew that too.

Armstrong: We hear that...

Nixon: The rain...

Armstrong: The rain. Well, we haven't been able to control the weather yet, but that's something we can look forward to as tomorrow's challenge.

Nixon: Right, right. Well, I can only summarize it because I don't want to hold you now. You have so much more to do. And gee, you look great - do you feel as good as you look?

Armstrong: Oh, we feel just perfectly, Mr. President.

Nixon: Yeah, I understand your - Frank Borman says you're a little younger by reason of having gone into space, is that right. Do you feel that way, a little younger?

Collins: We're a lot younger than Frank Borman. (Laughter).

Nixon: There he is, over there. Come on over Frank, so they can see you. You going to take that lying down?

Aldrin: It looks like he has aged in the last couple of days .

Nixon: Come on, Frank.

Borman: Mr. President, the one thing I wanted. You know we have a poet in Mike Collins and he really gave me a hard time for describing new words of fantastic and beautiful. And you - and counted them, in three minutes up there you used four fantastics and two beautifuls. (Laughter).

Nixon: Well, just let me close off with this one thing. I was thinking as you know, as you came down and we knew it was a success, and it had only been eight days, just a week, a long week. But this is the greatest week in the history of the world since the creation. Because as a result of what happened in this week, the world is bigger infinitely. And also, as I'm going to find on this trip around the world, and as Secretary Rogers will find as he covers the other countries and Asia, as a result of what you've done the world's never been closer together before. And we just thank you for that. And I only hope that all of us in government, all of us in America, that as a result of what you've done, we can do our job a little better. We can reach for the stars, just as you have reached so far for the stars. We don't want to hold you any longer. Anybody have a last re... How about promotions, do you think we could arrange something? (Laughter)

Armstrong: We're just pleased to be back and very honored that you were so kind as to come out here and welcome us back, and we look forward to getting out of this quarantine...

Collins: Great.

Armstrong: ...and talking without having glass between us.

Nixon: And incidentally, the speeches that you have to make at this dinner can be very short. And if you want to say fantastic or beautiful, that's all right with us. Don't try to think of any new adjectives; they've all been said. And now, I think incidentally, that all of us who - the millions that are seeing us on television now, are seeing you, would feel as I do that in a sense our prayers have been answered, and I think it would be very appropriate if Chaplain Piirto, the Chaplain of this ship were to offer a prayer of thanksgiving. If he would step up now. Chaplain, thank you.

Lt. Comdr. John A. Piirto, USN Chaplain: Let us pray. Lord, God, our Heavenly Father. Our minds are staggered and our spirit exalted with the magnitude and precision of this entire Apollo 11 mission. We have spent the past week in communal anxiety and hope as our astronauts sped through the glories and dangers of the heavens. As we try to understand and analyze the scope of this achievement for human life, our reason is overwhelmed with abounding gratitude and joy, even as we realize the increasing challenges of the future. This magnificent event illustrates anew what man can accomplish when purpose is firm and intent corporate. A man on the Moon was promised in this decade. And, though some were unconvinced, the reality is with us this morning, in the persons of astronauts Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins. We applaud their splendid exploits and we pour out our thanksgiving for their safe return to us, to their families, to all mankind. From our inmost beings, we sing humble, yet exuberant praise. May the great effort and commitment seen in this project, Apollo, inspire our lives to move similarly in other areas of need. May we the people by our enthusiasm and devotion and insight move to new landings in brotherhood, human concern, and mutual respect. May our country, afire with inventive leadership and backed by a committed followership, blaze new trails into all areas of human cares. See our enthusiasm and bless our joy with dedicated purpose for the many needs at hand. Link us in friendship with peoples throughout the world as we strive together to better the human condition. Grant us peace, beginning in our own hearts, and a mind attuned with good will toward our neighbor. All this we pray as our thanksgiving rings out to Thee. In the name of our Lord, amen.

Collins: Amen.

[National anthem plays.]
Speaker: The astronauts stood at attention.

PAO: This is Apollo Control. The participants in the post-recovery news conference have left the Control Center, and the post-recovery news conference will begin within the next few minutes in the MSC building 1 auditorium.

[This concludes the Apollo 11 Flight Journal.]
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