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Day 8: The News and Spacecraft Checks Journal Home Page Day 9: Re-entry and Splashdown

Apollo 11

Day 8, part 2: More Television and Stowage for Re-entry

Corrected Transcript and Commentary Copyright © 2009 by W. David Woods, Kenneth D. MacTaggart and Frank O'Brien. All rights reserved.
Last updated 2017-02-10
[In their final television transmission from the spacecraft, the crew of Apollo 11 comment on the historic significance of their voyage. Then they stow various items in preparation for tomorrow's re-entry. Mission Control gives them the weather forecast for their Pacific Ocean splashdown.]

[MP3 audio file. 2,652 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

177:08:35 McCandless: Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

177:08:42 Collins: Go ahead, Houston.

177:08:45 McCandless: Roger, 11. I've got a Flight Plan update for you, to give you an optimum attitude for the Earth in the number 1 window and the Moon in number 5 window. Over.

177:09:00 Collins: Ready to copy.

177:09:03 McCandless: Roger. Your attitude will be roll, 12 degrees; pitch, 270 degrees; yaw, 0 degrees. High Gain Antenna angles: pitch, plus 14; yaw, 263. Over.

177:09:25 Collins: Roger. I copy. Roll, 012; pitch, 270; y - yaw is zero. High Gain Antenna; pitch, plus 14 and yaw, 263.

177:09:35 McCandless: Roger. And when coming out of PTC, you might be advised that your deadband has been collapsed, so to follow the checklist items. Over.

177:09:46 Collins: Roger that.

[Comm break.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control; at 177 hours, 11 minutes. Network controller advises that we’re starting to get some semblance of TV signal from the spacecraft. We suspect we may be getting some checkout. We’ll continue to stand by and be prepared to take whatever’s sent.

[MP3 audio file. 1,450 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
177:12:23 McCandless: 11, this is Houston. We're receiving a black signal from you right now, but we are getting TV. Over.
[Very long comm break.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control. The Network controller now reports that the TV signal is down, apparently having been turned off, and we suspect that what we had was a test of the system by the crew. The television transmission from the spacecraft is scheduled to begin at 177 hours, 30 minutes or about 2 minutes past 6 Central Daylight Time. At the present time, Apollo 11 is 93,218 nautical miles [172,640 km] from the Earth.

[MP3 audio file. 1,156 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
177:23:22 Comm Tech: Goldstone, Comm Tech, Net 1.

177:23:30 Comm Tech: Goldstone, Houston. Comm Tech, Net 1.

177:23:34 Comm Tech: Goldstone, Comm Tech.

177:23:35 Comm Tech: Roger. Check for keying please.

177:23:36 Comm Tech: Roger.

177:23:45 Comm Tech: Goldstone, Houston. Comm Tech.

177:23:47 Comm Tech: Goldstone, Comm Tech. 100 percent keying.

177:23:49 Comm Tech: Roger. Thank you.

177:23:50 Comm Tech: I'm gonna go to Net 1 now.

177:23:51 Comm Tech: Roger.

177:24:10 McCandless: Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

177:24:14 Collins: Go ahead.

177:24:16 McCandless: From signal strength indications, it appears we may be locked up on a side lobe with the High Gain antenna. We'd like you to go into wide bandwidth for about 15 seconds and then back to narrow. Over.

177:24:29 Collins: All right.

[Long comm break.]
[MP3 audio file. 14.2 MB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control at 177 hours, 30 minutes. We're standing by at this time to receive television pictures from the Apollo 11 spacecraft. A short while ago we received the test transmission and apparently everything is functioning normally. We were receiving television signal from Goldstone relayed on through to Houston. We'll continue to stand by for the TV.

177:31:18 Armstrong: You have good S-band signal strength now, Houston?

177:31:22 McCandless: That's affirmative, 11.

177:31:29 Armstrong: Y’all set for TV?

177:31:35 McCandless: Roger. We're all set whenever you're ready to send.

177:31:39 Armstrong: Okay. [Long pause.]

177:31:52 McCandless: Okay. You're coming through loud and clear now, 11, with your patch.

PAO: We have black and white signals. We should have the conversion up shortly.

177:32:24 Armstrong: Good evening. This is the Commander of Apollo 11. A hundred years ago, Jules Verne wrote a book about a voyage to the Moon. His spaceship, Columbia, took off from Florida and landed in the Pacific Ocean after completing a trip to the Moon. It seems appropriate to us to share with you some of the reflections of the crew as the modern-day Columbia completes its rendezvous with the planet Earth and the same Pacific Ocean tomorrow. First, Mike Collins. [Long pause.]

177:33:35 McCandless: 11, this is Houston. We have an LOS here.

177:33:39 Armstrong: We'll be right back with you.

177:33:40 McCandless: Roger. [Pause.]

177:33:51 McCandless: In the interim, you may be interested in knowing that Jan and the children, and Pat and the youngsters, and Andy Aldrin are down here in the viewing room watching this evening.

177:34:05 Collins: Oh, we're glad to hear that. [Long pause.]

177:34:38 McCandless: Okay, 11. You're back on, with Mike in the middle of the screen there.

177:34:44 Collins: Roger. This trip of ours to the Moon may have looked, to you, simple or easy. I'd like to assure you that has not been the case. The Saturn V rocket which put us into orbit is an incredibly complicated piece of machinery, every piece of which worked flawlessly. This computer up above my head has a 38,000-word vocabulary, each word of which has been very carefully chosen to be of the utmost value to us, the crew. This switch which I have in my hand now, has over 300 counterparts in the Command Module alone, this one single switch design. In addition to that, there are myriads of circuit breakers, levers, rods, and other associated controls. The SPS engine, our large rocket engine on the aft end of our Service Module, must have performed flawlessly, or we would have been stranded in lunar orbit. The parachutes up above my head must work perfectly tomorrow or we will plummet into the ocean. We have always had confidence that all this equipment will work, and work properly, and we continue to have confidence that it will do so for the remainder of the flight. All this is possible only through the blood, sweat and tears of a number of people. First, the American workmen who put these pieces of machinery together in the factory. Second, the painstaking work done by the various test teams during the assembly and the re-test after assembly. And finally, the people at the Manned Spacecraft Center, both in management, in mission planning, in flight control, and last but not least, in crew training. This operation is somewhat like the periscope of a submarine. All you see is the three of us, but beneath the surface are thousands and thousands of others, and to all those, I would like to say, thank you very much. [Long pause.]

177:37:52 McCandless: 11, this is Houston. We're getting a good picture of Buzz now, but no voice modulation. And would you open up the f-stop on the TV camera? Try 2 - 2, please (meaning f/2.2).

177:38:13 McCandless: That appears to be a lot better now. We're still not receiving Buzz's audio.

177:38:20 Aldrin: Good evening. I'd like to discuss with you a few of the more symbolic aspects of the flight of our mission, Apollo 11. As we've been discussing the events that have taken place in the past 2 or 3 days here on board our spacecraft, we've come to the conclusion that this has been far more than three men on a voyage to the Moon. More, still, than the efforts of a government and industry team. More, even, than the efforts of one nation. We feel that this stands as a symbol of the insatiable curiosity of all mankind to explore the unknown. Neil's statement the other day upon first setting foot on the surface of the Moon, "This is a small step for a man, but a great leap for mankind," I believe sums up these feelings very nicely. We accepted the challenge of going to the Moon; the acceptance of this challenge was inevitable. The relative ease with which we carried out our mission, I believe, is a tribute to the timeliness of that acceptance. Today, I feel we're fully capable of accepting expanded roles in the exploration of space. In retrospect, we have all been particularly pleased with the call signs that we very laboriously chose for our spacecraft, Columbia and Eagle. We've been particularly pleased with the emblem of our flight, depicting the U.S. eagle bringing the universal symbol of peace from the Earth, from the planet Earth to the Moon, that symbol being the olive branch. It was our overall crew choice to deposit a replica of this symbol on the Moon. Personally, in reflecting on the events of the past several days, a verse from Psalms comes to mind to me. "When I consider the heavens, the work of Thy fingers, the moon and the stars which Thou hast ordained, what is man that Thou art mindful of him." [Long pause.]

177:41:42 Armstrong: The responsibility for this flight lies first with history and with the giants of science who have preceded this effort. Next with the American people, who have through their will, indicated their desire. Next, to four administrations, and their Congresses, for implementing that will. And then, to the agency and industry teams that built our spacecraft, the Saturn, the Columbia, the Eagle, and the little EMU; the space suit and backpack that was our small spacecraft out on the lunar surface. We'd like to give a special thanks to all those Americans who built those spacecraft, who did the construction, design, the tests, and put their - their hearts and all their abilities into those craft. To those people, tonight, we give a special thank you, and to all the other people that are listening and watching tonight, God bless you. Good night from Apollo 11. [Long pause.]

177:43:52 McCandless: 11, this is Houston. We're getting a zoom view out the window now. [Long pause.]

177:44:24 Armstrong: Apollo 11, signing off.

[Long comm break.]
PAO: That brief view of the Earth came from 91,371 nautical miles [169,219 km] out in space after a brief and sincere and moving transmission from the Apollo 11 spacecraft. This is Apollo Control at 177 hours, 45 minutes.

[MP3 audio file. 442 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
177:47:48 Collins: Houston, Apollo 11. Do you want to crank up PTC again? Do you have some reason to hold this attitude, or what's your pleasure?

177:47:57 McCandless: You can crank up PTC again, Mike, any time you like. And I might add, I thought that was a mighty fine TV presentation. There's certainly nothing I can add to it from down here.

177:48:10 Collins: Thank you.

[Long comm break.]
[MP3 audio file. 3,578 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
177:53:27 McCandless: Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

177:53:33 Armstrong: Go ahead.

177:53:36 McCandless: Okay, 11. I've got a few small items here - one Flight Plan update and some entry photography information, if you’re ready to copy. Over.

177:53:49 Armstrong: Go ahead.

177:53:51 McCandless: Roger. At 180 hours, 50 minutes GET, we should like to delete your oxygen fuel cell purge.

177:54:02 Armstrong: Okay.

177:54:03 McCandless: And on the entry photography, if you’re going to use a fresh magazine of color interior film, we recommend the following exposure settings: f:11 at 1/250th, six frames per second, focus on 7 feet for the fireball; f:2.0, 1/60th of a second, six frames per second, focus on 50 feet when the chutes open. If you’re using a magazine, part of which has already been used for interior shots, we recommend f:16 at 1/500th of a second, six frames per second, focus on 7 feet for the fireball; f2.8, 1/60th of a second, six frames per second, focus on 50 feet when the parachutes open. And we would like to know the magazine number that you are intending to use when you have a chance. Over.

177:55:22 Aldrin: Okay. I think we’ve got those. We will be using a fresh one and it’ll be color interior. Over.

177:55:32 McCandless: Roger. When you get - when you get it out, we'd like to have the number of the magazine, or the letter of the magazine relayed down.

177:55:42 Aldrin: Okay. And we're thinking that we might want to run some of this at 12 frames a second. I don’t think we can get everything from 0.5 - 0.05g down. That’ll only give us about 7.8 minutes - frames - double that. I guess maybe just an occasional burst to 12 frames would be what we’d want and the rest of it at six. Over. [Long pause.]

177:56:23 McCandless: This is Houston. That plan sounds fine with us, Neil.

177:56:28 Aldrin: Okay.

177:56:30 McCandless: And lastly, we'd like to know if your stowage configuration for entry is going to conform to the nominal. The Retros down here are anxious to get an accurate c.g. computed for you, and in particular, where the LEVAs are being stowed. Over.

[c.g. = centre of gravity.]
177:56:53 Armstrong: Okay. We think we’re going to put the LEVAs and the helmets in the hatch bag, and we'll let you know any other non-standard stowage locations that we complete this evening.

177:57:08 McCandless: This is Houston. Roger. Out.

[Long comm break.]
[MP3 audio file. 658 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
178:06:57 Collins: Houston, Apollo 11.

178:07:01 McCandless: Go ahead, 11.

178:07:03 Collins: Roger. The magazine we'll be using for entry tomorrow is magazine M. Over.

178:07:10 McCandless: Roger. Understand. Magazine M as in Mike.

178:07:14 Collins: That's right.

178:07:19 McCandless: Thank you. Out.

[Very long comm break.]
[MP3 audio file. 730 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
178:17:38 McCandless: Apollo 11, this is Houston. Your friendly Green Team going off for the night, and going off for the last time. We wish to bid you a good night and Godspeed.

178:17:51 Armstrong: Thank you. We appreciate all that fine work done by the - by the Green Team, and we'll be thanking you in person when we get back.

178:18:00 McCandless: Roger. We'll see you on the ground.

178:18:03 Aldrin: Really enjoyed working with all of you. Thanks very much. Over.

178:18:08 McCandless: Roger.

178:18:09 Collins: As usual, all you Greenies.

178:18:11 McCandless: They're all smiles down here, even the trench.

[Very long comm break.]
[MP3 audio file. 941 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control. Here in the Mission Operations Control Room of Mission Control Center, the White Team of flight controllers under Flight Director Gene Kranz settling in for the 10-hour shift ahead until 5:00 am. Green Team Flight Director Cliff Charlesworth is now en route to the Houston Apollo News Center and shortly will be there for his Change-of-Shift Press Conference. Estimating about 10 minutes for his arrival. We'll continue to monitor the Apollo 11 air-ground circuit should the communications resume. Standing by; 178 hours, 25 minutes Ground Elapsed Time; this is Apollo Control.

[MP3 audio file. 594 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control. Apollo 11 now 88,442 nautical miles [163,795 km] out from Earth, approaching at a velocity of 6,299 feet per second [1,920 m/s]. Change-of-Shift Press Conference with the Green Team Flight Director Cliff Charlesworth due to begin any moment now in the NASA Apollo News Center Auditorium. And at 178 hours, 34 minutes Ground Elapsed Time; this is Apollo Control.

[MP3 audio file. 300 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
178:40:30 Collins: Houston, Apollo 11.

178:40:35 McCandless: Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

178:40:39 Collins: Roger. How's our thruster firing activity? We're about ready to crank up PTC if you are.

178:40:46 McCandless: Roger. Go ahead.

178:40:49 Collins: Okay. Thank you.

[Very long comm break.]
[MP3 audio file. 1,994 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
178:56:51 McCandless: Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

178:56:55 Aldrin: Go ahead, Houston.

178:56:57 McCandless: 11, we'd like you to shift to an Omni antenna configuration at the present time. We're requesting the S-band antenna Omni switch to Bravo, and the S-band antenna Omni switch to Omni. The High Gain antenna track in Manual. Pitch, minus 50; yaw, 270. Over.

178:57:25 Aldrin: Roger. I'll do that right now.

178:57:30 McCandless: Roger. And if Mike has a minute, we'd like to do a little bit of trouble-shooting. It seems he's either flat-chested or something because we've lost respiration rate on the Biomed telemetry. That is, his EPN trace down here is flat.

178:57:56 Aldrin: He was shaving a little bit ago. He might have just let it slip. Hold on a moment.

178:58:06 Collins: All the blasted wires are all connected, is all I know.

178:58:11 McCandless: Okay, Mike. We had a request that you disconnect the yellow connector from the signal conditioner and verify that it looks okay, reconnect it and then, if you would, check the two electrodes that are placed one on each side of your lower rib cage. Over.

178:58:36 Collins: I'll bet you there's a smile on Charlesworth's face.

178:58:41 McCandless: Cliff is not on right now. Gene Kranz just relieved him a few minutes ago.

178:58:50 Collins: Roger that.

[Comm break.]
178:59:56 Collins: All those wires and things look normal up here.

179:00:00 McCandless: Roger, Mike. We could see variations on our traces. You've connected and disconnected, but the medics still don't have a signal. [Pause.]

179:00:16 McCandless: Looks like you're sending us a message of some sort. [Pause.]

179:00:29 Collins: Well, I promise to let you know if I stop breathing.

[Comm break.]
[MP3 audio file. 247 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
179:03:23 McCandless: Apollo 11, Apollo 11, this is Houston broadcasting in the blind. Request Omni Bravo. Request Omni Bravo. Over.
[Long comm break.]
[MP3 audio file. 672 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control; 179 hours, 9 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. During the past half hour, there have been some exchanges between spacecraft communicator Bruce McCandless here in Mission Control and the crew of Apollo 11. One item they're trying to sort out and troubleshoot, some difficulties with the biomedical sensors attached to the chest of Command Module Pilot Mike Collins. Let's play back the accumulated tape, and hopefully by the time it's ended, we will have picked up communications again and we'll re-join the conversation live. Roll tape please.

[MP3 audio file. 1,430 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
179:10:45 McCandless: Apollo 11, this is Houston. Communication re-established.

179:10:51 SC: [Garble]. [Pause.]

179:11:51 McCandless: Apollo 11, this is Houston. Will you confirm you're in Omni Bravo? Over.

179:12:08 Aldrin: Okay. That ought to give it to you.

179:12:12 McCandless: Roger. Out.

[Comm break.]
179:14:51 McCandless: Apollo 11, this is Houston. Mike, we're still getting a flat trace on you for the impedance pneumograph. Before you turn in this evening, you might try putting some fresh paste in the sensors, and if that doesn't work, the medics have agreed to forget about it. Over. [Long pause.]

179:15:17 Armstrong: Mike's off the loop right now. I'll convey the message.

179:15:20 McCandless: Okay. Thank you. [Long pause.]

179:15:46 Collins: Houston, Apollo 11. Say again.

179:15:50 McCandless: Roger, Mike. The trace on your respiration rate is still flat. If you have time this evening before turning in, we would suggest that you try putting some fresh paste in the two electrodes that go on the side of your lower rib cage. And if that doesn't work, just give up on it.

179:16:13 Collins: [Garble].

[Very long comm break.]
[MP3 audio file. 1,668 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control. Columbia now 85,198 nautical miles [157,787 km] out from Earth, approaching Earth at a velocity of 6,443 feet per second [1,964 m/s]. Still standing by for resumption of air-to-ground communications [background laughter] which may be difficult in as much as CapCom is leaving the room [background laughter]. We'll continue to monitor air-to-ground as the crew prepares for their pre-sleep checklists, sets up the Passive Thermal Control mode and sacks out for about a 10-hour rest period in preparation for tomorrow's entry and subsequent recovery in the mid-Pacific aboard the carrier Hornet, now hove-to on the aiming point or near the aiming point. Standing by at 179 hours, 27 minutes Ground Elapsed Time; this is Apollo Control.

[MP3 audio file. 1,214 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control. Columbia now 82,972 nautical miles [153,664 km] out from Earth, traveling inbound at 6,546 feet per second [1,995 m/s]. There have been no further communications with the crew of Apollo 11 in the last half hour or so. At this time they should be going through their pre-sleep checklist, or possibly their evening meal, before beginning a 7-hour rest period. We'll take down the circuit at this time and come back when and if the conversation resumes prior to - the time the crew begins their rest period. At 180 hours, 3 minutes Ground Elapsed Time; this is Apollo Control.

[At this point, the PAO audio feed switches to coverage of the launch of a Delta rocket carrying the Intelsat 3 satellite. The launch does not go ahead and PAO returns to coverage of the Apollo 11 mission.]

[MP3 audio file. 1,830 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

180:07:45 SC: (Sound of Train and gunfire.)

180:08:17 McCandless: Hey, 11, this is Houston. You might tell Buzz not to exercise quite so strenuously. Over.

180:08:30 Aldrin: What's the problem?

180:08:32 McCandless: Say again.

180:08:36 Aldrin: What's the problem?

180:08:42 McCandless: Okay. That's one - that's one on us. [Laughter. Long pause.]

180:09:19 McCandless: 11, Houston. Seriously, that comment was just aimed at your musical selection.

180:09:26 Armstrong: Okay.

180:09:39 SC: (Sound of train)

180:09:59 Collins: Come on Neil, not so fast.

180:10:05 SC: (Sound of train)

180:10:19 Armstrong: You have an ergometer up here.

180:10:30 McCandless: What was that? Real time exercise?

180:10:35 Armstrong: Just trying the ergometer.

180:10:37 McCandless: Roger.

[Very long comm break.]

[MP3 audio file. 2,031 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

180:21:22 McCandless: Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

180:21:28 Aldrin: Go ahead, Houston.

180:21:30 McCandless: We'd like to know what your plans are as far as turning in this evening. Our - in the Flight Plan, we show you commencing a rest period at about 182 hours, and what are you planning to do on that? We're going to be watching the weather here, and we expect to have an update on the weather, I guess, in about another half hour or 45 minutes, to pass to you. Over.

180:21:57 Armstrong: We're going to probably stick with the Flight Plan pretty much. We are going to - if - check the lights in the northwest corner of the U.S. and southwest corner of Canada. If we can see up that high into the northern hemisphere. Other than that, we'll be on the Flight Plan.

180:22:21 McCandless: Roger. For your information, the laser from McDonald Observatory in West Texas will be up from about 181 hours and 30 minutes, on for 1 hour. You should be able to spot the Earth out of the number 1 window every time you pass roll 357 degrees and they, of course, are in West Texas. Over.

180:22:47 Armstrong: Okay. Thank you. [Long pause.]

180:23:07 Collins: How about the number 5 window?

180:23:16 McCandless: Stand by a minute. [Pause.]

180:23:24 McCandless: Roger. For the number 5 window. That'll be - every time you pass 230 degrees in roll. Over.

180:23:32 Collins: Beautiful. Thank you.

180:23:36 Collins: You guys are on your toes down there.

180:23:39 McCandless: Roger...

180:23:40 Armstrong: You have a new, new star chart. You must have a new, new star chart. Huh?

180:23:45 McCandless: Oh, we got a fresh, fresh FAO here.

[Very long comm break.]

[MP3 audio file. 278 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

PAO: This is Apollo Control, 180 hours, 25 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. We have some 4 minutes accumulated tape in recent transmissions between Columbia and the ground. We'll roll these tapes at this time.
[The contents of these tapes are reproduced above.]
180:32:04 Comm Tech: Honeysuckle, Houston Comm Tech. Net 1. Voice check.

180:32:09 Honeysuckle: Honeysuckle. Read you loud and clear.

180:32:10 Comm Tech: Roger. Read you the same.

[MP3 audio file. 799 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
180:36:56 Aldrin: Houston, Apollo 11. How much longer do you want to keep charging Battery B? [Long pause.]

180:37:17 McCandless: 11, this is Houston. Nominally we're looking for about another hour-and-a-half, but what we'd like to do is continue charging until shortly before you turn in for the night. Over.

180:37:30 Aldrin: That'll be fine. Are you going to want to charge A again at all?

180:37:36 McCandless: Negative, 11.

180:37:40 Aldrin: Okay.

[Long comm break.]

[MP3 audio file. 596 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

180:42:18 McCandless: 11, this is Houston. At about 180:45, we'll be handing over from Goldstone to Honeysuckle, and I'm handing over to Charlie. See you when you get back. Over.

180:42:33 Armstrong: Okay, Bruce. Good night. Thank you.

180:42:35 McCandless: Roger. Good night.

180:42:36 Aldrin: Thank you very much, Bruce. It's been a pleasure working with you.

180:42:38 McCandless: Have a nice trip down.

[Very long comm break.]

[For about 40 seeconds, the PAO air/ground recording has an unusual warbling tone cycling at about 2 Hertz.]

[MP3 audio file. 1,540 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

PAO: This is Apollo Control. The weird noise has been reported by network controllers as not being on the downlink from the spacecraft. Now it's stopped. Let's leave the circuit open here in the period prior to the time the crew goes to sleep and monitor the air-ground circuit.

[MP3 audio file. 632 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control. We've been standing by now for quite some time for resumption of communications, but apparently no one is saying anything tonight. Apollo 11 now 78,134 nautical miles [144,704] out from Earth, approaching at 6,785 feet per second [2,068 m/s]. And at 181 hours, 17 minutes Ground Elapsed Time; this is Apollo Control.
[MP3 audio file. 939 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
181:26:46 Collins: Houston, Apollo 11. Over. [Pause.]

181:26:55 Lewis: Apollo 11, Houston. Go ahead.

181:27:02 Collins: Roger, Houston. For Retro, I have the anticipated location of all the entry stowage, and I suggest you pull out the entry checklist, and we'll go through those maps in the front of it.

181:27:19 Lewis: Apollo 11, Houston. Could you stand by just a few minutes? Charlie and Flight are out getting a weather briefing. They'll be back shortly.

181:27:33 Collins: Is this Ken?

181:27:35 Lewis: Say again?

181:27:40 Collins: Is this Owen?

181:27:42 Lewis: No, this is Chuck Lewis. Charlie Duke is out with Flight getting a weather briefing right now.

[Collins was speculating that the unfamiliar voice who has taken over as CapCom from Bruce McCandless might be Ken Mattingly or Owen Garriott, both of whom share duties at the CapCom console with McCandless. In fact it is Chuck Lewis, who was Assistant Flight Director to Gene Kranz on the White Team.]
181:27:49 Collins: Okay. They're out drinking coffee. I know.

181:27:52 Lewis: (Laughter) They'll be back momentarily.

[MP3 audio file. 389 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control. We've had one brief communication from Apollo 11. Spacecraft communicator Bruce McCandless is out of the room, the Assistant Flight Director Chuck Lewis went down to the console to talk. Let's play that tape back and re-join live when the conversation picks up again.
[MP3 audio file. 281 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: I stand corrected. That's Charlie Duke on the CapCom slot. Bruce McCandless on the last half hour has been relieved. Charlie is likely to respond. Now he's putting on his headset. We'll listen in.
[MP3 audio file. 7,117 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
181:35:55 Duke: Hello, Apollo 11. Houston. Over.

181:36:00 Collins: Roger, Houston. Apollo 11. Did you get the word on the entry checklist?

181:36:05 Duke: Roger, Mike. We sure did. We're ready to talk about it, if you are. Over.

181:36:13 Collins: I think the quickest thing is to go through page by page, the first part of the entry checklist where it has a map. Starting on the page with compartment L2 and L3. Are you with me?

181:36:25 Duke: Rog. With you.

181:36:28 Collins: Okay. L2 is as shown. L3 is as shown. There is about half the food remaining in L3.

181:36:35 Duke: Roger.

181:36:36 Collins: Where it says - where it says "And note", the CMP PGA is located in the L-shaped bag with the other two PGAs. The LM shield was jettisoned with the - Correction, the CMP helmet shield was jettisoned with the LM, and his helmet and gloves, instead of being in the sleep restraint, are in the hatch bags.

181:37:06 Duke: Okay. Let's see now. Your PGA is in the L-shaped bag with the other two PGAs, and your helmet and gloves are in the L-shaped bag instead of the sleep restraint.

181:37:21 Collins: The helmet and gloves are in the hatch bag, the great big bag that's underneath the left-hand couch that you put the hatch in.

181:37:30 Duke: Rog. I thought I - That's what I copied. Okay. Go ahead.

181:37:37 Collins: Okay. The next page is identical except nitpicking point: at R1, we got the entry checklist. Other than that it’s identical, and the third page has got some changes.

181:37:49 Duke: Go ahead.

181:37:50 Collins: In A1 - Are you with me? I'm over there in compartment A1, now.

181:37:56 Duke: Go ahead, Mike. Over.

181:38:04 Collins: Okay. Compartment A1, the 16-millimeter magazine will be located in window number 4 instead of 5. Tissue dispensers - there’s only one of them left. And compartment U3, the 16-millimeter bracket is on window 4, and the PGA bag - add the CMP’s PGA, plus add two LCGs. And compartment A8, delete two LCGs, add one PPK, making a total of four; and add 10 pounds of LM miscellaneous equipment. We told you five the other day. We think ten is probably closer. Over.

181:38:57 Duke: Copy. [Pause.]

181:39:04 Collins: And that's all the changes on that page. Ready for the next page?

181:39:07 Duke: Rog. Go ahead, Mike.

181:39:12 Collins: On your next page, in compartment B1, we estimate about 15 percent of that food is remaining. In B2 we took PPK out of there and put trash in it. In B3, the 16-millimeter cable, the 18-millimeter lens, and the right-angle mirror are on window number 4. And sorta brings you all up to date.

181:39:42 Duke: Roger. How about the LEVAs, Mike? Where did you put those? Over.

181:39:53 Collins: They're in the hatch bag.

181:39:56 Duke: Roger. Stand by. Our only concern, 11, is with the stuff you got in the hatch bag. That's pretty big bulk between you and A8, and we'd like to talk about moving that over to the sleep restraint. If you’ll stand by. I'll verify that. Over.

181:40:16 Collins: Okay. [Long pause.]

181:41:16 Duke: 11, Houston. Our recommendation on the gear you got in the helmet bag - correction, the hatch bag - would be to remove that stuff and put it in the sleep restraint under the right couch. The reason is that the hatch bag straps are only configured for zero g, and it’s a pretty difficult job getting it lashed down. With the gear in the sleep restraint, it's a pretty standard lash-down procedure, and you can also use the Beta cord that you have on board. You concur? Over. [Pause.]

181:42:03 Collins: Yeah. We'll look at it, Charlie, and let you know.

181:42:06 Duke: Roger. And I got a couple of other things, Mike. We need to terminate Battery B charge at this time, and also, the weather is clobbering in at our targeted landing point due to scattered thunderstorms. We don't want to tangle with one of those, so we’re going to move you - your aim point up-range. Correction, it’ll be down-range, to target for a 1,500-nautical-mile entry, so we can guarantee uplift control. The new coordinates are 13 degrees, 19 minutes North; 169, 10 minutes West. The weather in that area is super. We got 2,000 scattered, 8,000 scattered with 10 miles visibility and 6-foot seas and the Hornet is sitting in great position to get to that targeted position. Over. [Pause.]

181:43:21 Collins: Roger.

[Long comm break.]

[MP3 audio file. 2,764 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

PAO: This is Apollo Control. To recap, briefly, the conversation a few moments ago between Charlie Duke and the crew of Columbia. Because of forecast thunderstorms in the prime recovery area in the mid-Pacific for tomorrow, the Apollo spacecraft's lifting capabilities will be used to stretch the entry path some 215 nautical miles further downrange toward Hawaii to a new landing point or aiming point, with the very rough preliminary coordinates of 13 degrees, 19 minutes North by 169 degrees, 10 minutes West. These numbers will be refined through the night, as Retrofire Officer exercises the computer and comes up with more definitive numbers. These will be passed on as they are available. Apollo 11 now 75,951 nautical miles [140,661 km] out from Earth approaching at 6,899 feet per second [2,103 m/s]. At 181 hours, 50 minutes and standing by on the air-ground circuit, this is Apollo Control.

181:51:59 Duke: Apollo 11, Houston. Some of the general last minute updates here. On the entry, we had told you on the camera to set it at 50 feet. It turns out the biggest number on the camera is 25 feet, so just set it at infinity. Over.

181:52:19 Collins: Roger. Infinity.

[Long comm break.]

[MP3 audio file. 290 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

181:57:42 Duke: Hello, Apollo 11. Houston. We're ready to put you to bed and say good night, if you give us your crew status report and verify that you changed out the CO2 canister a moment ago. Over.

181:57:55 Armstrong: Stand by.

[Comm break.]

[MP3 audio file. 853 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

182:00:43 Armstrong: Okay, Charlie. Crew status report follows. CDR, 11023; CMP, 10025; LMP, 09027. Canister change complete.

182:01:01 Duke: Roger. Thank you very much there.

182:01:02 Armstrong: All men okay.

182:01:03 Duke: Roger. Thank you. Could you give us an onboard readout, please, sir?

182:01:08 Armstrong: Stand by. Okay. Batt C, 37; Pyro Batt A, 37; Batt B, 37. RCS A, 51; B, 63; C, 62; D, 58.

182:01:26 Duke: Roger. Copy. Thank you much.

[Comm break.]

[MP3 audio file. 2,762 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

182:03:47 Duke: Apollo 11, Houston. It's good night from the White Team for the last time. We'll be off when you wake up in the morning. It's been a pleasure working with you guys. It was a beautiful show from all three of you. We appreciate it very much, and we'll see you when you get out of the LRL. Over.

182:04:04 Armstrong: Okay, Charlie. Thanks to you and all the White Team for a great job down there all the way through. Thank you.

182:04:11 Collins: Outstanding.

182:04:13 Aldrin: Thank you very much, Charlie. Thanks.

182:04:16 Duke: Thanks to you guys, too. [Long pause.]

182:04:36 Duke: And, 11, Houston. Mike, you get your chance at landing tomorrow. No go-around.

182:04:44 Collins: Rog. You're going to let me land closer to Hawaii too, aren't you?

182:04:47 Duke: That's right, sir.

[Long comm break.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control. All goodnights having been said, the crew of Apollo 11 is now preparing to get their 10 hours rest and their last night in space. Here in the Control Center, on one of the 10 by 10 Eidophor television projectors - a drawing has been projected on the screen ribbing CapCom Charlie Duke for his slight error yesterday on the television pass where he mistook the Moon for Earth. It has the spacecraft midway between the Moon and Earth and it says, 'Neil, I just spotted a continent on the Moon. Charlie, the camera's on the Earth now.' Apollo 11 now 74,906 nautical miles [138,726 km] out from Earth, approaching at 6,954 feet per second [2,120 m/s]. And at 182 hours, 6 minutes Ground Elapsed Time, this is Apollo Control.
[The PAO announcer is mistaken in the duration off the rest period. It is 7 hours, not 10 and their wake up time is scheduled at 189 hours.]

[MP3 audio file. 324 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

182:07:59 Duke: 11, Houston. We got some word just a moment ago that the McDonald Observatory is - said they had picked up the spacecraft in their telescope. Over.

182:08:09 Armstrong: Outstanding. We have been looking for their laser but haven't had much luck yet.

182:08:16 Duke: Roger. We'll pass it on to them, Neil. Thank you.

[Very long comm break.]

[MP3 audio file. 489 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]

PAO: This is Apollo Control. 182 hours, 10 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. We thought that was all the air-to-ground for tonight prior to the crew going to sleep, but just a few moments ago, there was a brief exchange reporting to Apollo 11 crew that the McDonald Observatory in far West Texas had the spacecraft in their telescope field of view. Let's roll that tape now and then shut it down again.
[MP3 audio file. 204 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control. That completes the very brief exchange of a few moments ago. At 182 hours, 11 minutes Ground Elapsed Time; this is Apollo Control.
[MP3 audio file. 2,283 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control. 183 hours, 25 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Columbia spacecraft now 69,520 nautical miles [128,751 km] out from Earth, approaching at 6 thou - as you were - 7,262 feet per second [2,213 m/s]. Crew now in their rest period. Started their sleep period a little over an hour ago. To reiterate the change in landing point, this is a weather avoidance situation where thunderstorms are forecast for the aiming point - the original aiming point in the mid-Pacific. Therefore, after the normal Entry Interface, the lifting characteristics of the Apollo Command Module will be used to extend the entry range some 215 nautical miles farther down range toward Hawaii to a preliminary aiming point. That is, the aiming point may shift around between now and entry which is some 11 hours, 36 minutes from now. But at any rate, the aiming point as calculated now is some 13 degrees, 19 minutes North latitude by 169 degrees, 10 minutes West longitude. The preliminary time of drogue deploy is 195 hours, 12 minutes - or as you were - yes 195 hours, 12 minutes, 4 seconds. And the net extension over the earlier splash time is something like 40 seconds. At 183 hours, 27 minutes Ground Elapsed Time, this is Apollo Control.
[MP3 audio file. 1,008 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control; 185 hours, 29 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. 9 hours, 33 minutes until entry. Crew is still asleep at this time; scheduled to wake up at 189 hours Ground Elapsed Time, some 3½ hours from now. We've had no word from the crew since the scheduled sleep period began. Apollo 11 now 61,034 nautical miles [113,035 km] out from Earth and a velocity of 7,815 feet per second [2,382 m/s]. At 185 hours, 30 minutes Ground Elapsed Time; this is Apollo Control.
[MP3 audio file. 4,756 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO: This is Apollo Control; 186 hours, 28 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. 8 hours, 35 minutes to entry. Crew of Columbia still asleep at this time. Some 2½ hours away from wake-up time at 189 hours Ground Elapsed Time. Because of weather avoidance in the prime recovery zone in mid-Pacific, southwest of Hawaii, it has been decided some time ago to shift the landing point or aiming point some 215 nautical miles downrange from the pre-mission aiming point. And all of the numbers concerned with entry and post-entry events have been generated, and we shall forward them at this time. Pencils ready? Command Module/Service Module separation; 194:48:07 Ground Elapsed Time, 11:20:08 Central Daylight Time. Entry Interface, that's 400,000 feet [121.92 km] above the Earth's surface; Ground Elapsed Time 195:03:07, 11:35:08 Central Daylight Time. Begin blackout; 195:03:25 Ground Elapsed Time, 11:35:26 Central Daylight Time. 05G [twentieth of a g]; 195:03:35 GET, 11:35:36 CDT. End of blackout; 195:06:56 GET, 11:38:57 CDT. Drogue chutes deploy; 195:12:04 GET, 11:44:05 CDT. Main chutes deploy; 195:12:52, 11:44:53 CDT. Touchdown; 195:17:49 GET, 11:49:50 CDT. Maximum g-loading to be pulled during the entry phase will be 6.12 g's. Entry velocity, that's at Entry Interface of 400,000 feet, will be 36,194 feet per second [11,032 metres/second]. Flight path angle, minus 6.5 degrees. Aiming point location; 13 degrees, 19 minutes North latitude; 169 degrees, 09 minutes West longitude. At 186 hours, 32 minutes Ground Elapsed Time; this is Apollo Control.
[MP3 audio file. 1,357 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO:This is Apollo Control; 187 hours, 28 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. 7 hours, 34 minutes to entry. Flight Surgeon Ken Beers reports that all three crew members are sleeping soundly at this time. Their sleep period will end probably at 189 hours although they may sleep an additional hour to 190 hours. Spacecraft being tracked now through the Guam station. A line projected out from Earth to what is called a sub-satellite point, or the point directly under the spacecraft, would put it over dead center of Australia. At 187 hours, 29 minutes Ground Elapsed Time, this is Apollo Control.
[MP3 audio file. 1,127 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO:This is Apollo Control; 188 hours, 28 minutes Ground Elapsed Time. Apollo 11 now 46,254 nautical miles [85,662 km] out from Earth. Velocity continuing to increase; now 9,081 feet per second [2,768 m/s]. There'll be a dramatic increase in velocity as the spacecraft gets closer in. Here in Mission Control Center, the entry team headed up by Flight Director Milt Windler is beginning to come aboard. Hand-over in progress from Gene Kranz's White Team. Crew still asleep at this time. They're some 6 hours, 34 minutes from Entry Interface. And at 188 hours, 29 minutes Ground Elapsed Time; this is Apollo Control.
[MP3 audio file. 534 kB. Clip courtesy John Stoll, ACR Senior Technician at NASA Johnson.]
PAO:This is Apollo Control at 188 hours, 43 minutes. Mid-Course Correction number 7 has been cancelled, and we will add one hour of rest time to the Flight Plan. Crew will be awakened at 190 hours elapsed time. To repeat, we have cancelled Mid-Course Correction number 7 and we will allow the crew to sleep until 190 hours elapsed time. This is Mission Control, Houston.

[This concludes the transcript for flight day 8 and the subsequent overnight period. The journal continues with crew wake-up on their last day in space.]
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